cultural heritage – Reggae Shack http://reggae-shack.com/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 16:19:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://reggae-shack.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile-120x120.png cultural heritage – Reggae Shack http://reggae-shack.com/ 32 32 Brazil requests intangible cultural heritage status for reggae dance | Entertainment https://reggae-shack.com/brazil-requests-intangible-cultural-heritage-status-for-reggae-dance-entertainment/ https://reggae-shack.com/brazil-requests-intangible-cultural-heritage-status-for-reggae-dance-entertainment/#respond Sun, 18 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/brazil-requests-intangible-cultural-heritage-status-for-reggae-dance-entertainment/ The people of São Luís in Brazil are proud that their city is known around the world as “Brazilian Jamaica”. And the reason for this designation is the fact that reggae music is the heart of São Luís. People are so in love with this Jamaican music that they have their own reggae museum; their […]]]>


The people of São Luís in Brazil are proud that their city is known around the world as “Brazilian Jamaica”. And the reason for this designation is the fact that reggae music is the heart of São Luís. People are so in love with this Jamaican music that they have their own reggae museum; their own reggae dance, the agarradinho; The town hall has its own Reggae strategic planning committee; reggae music is played around every corner; reggae festivals are part of the fabric of the city; and reggae shows abound on the radio.

One of these programs is “Reggae Point”, which was broadcast live 30 years ago. During that time, it aired continuously for three decades, with a two-hour prime-time slot on the radio every day, including Sundays. Waldiney Silva, known to everyone as DJ Waldiney, has been the enthusiastic host for 26 of those years, and he is honored to celebrate the milestone of the program.

“The power and energy of reggae music is so special and vibrant. There is no other music that can give a person what reggae music does. For decades our city was called Brazilian Jamaica. We wear our Jamaican colors at parties. Around every corner you can hear reggae music, sometimes houses, ”said DJ Waldiney, who speaks only Portuguese. The Sunday Gleaner by its interpreter, Daniella Dourado.

The disc jock, who can sing reggae songs verbatim, explained that “Reggae Point” was born out of another reggae program, “Reggae Night”, and since then it has been airing continuously for three decades. . “Reggae Point” dominates the main audience on Mirante FM 96.1, beating all other reggae programs on various radio stations. From the start he has had enormous importance for the spread of reggae music in Brazil, especially because beyond playing two hours of reggae music he also shares information about the genre, and in the past he has helped bring many Jamaican artists and bands to play in our city, ”said the reggae-loving DJ, who always has a visit to Jamaica on his wishlist.

One of the fascinating things about the São Luís reggae experience is that reggae music from the 60s and 70s dominates the airwaves. “We play a lot of songs from that era because they are the most inspiring to people. But we also play current artists eg Tarrus Riley, Etana, Richie Stephens. A few years ago Richie Stephens came to São Luís and heard them play a very old reggae song from the 70s, and he couldn’t believe it. He said, “In Jamaica, we don’t play these songs! The song was Donkey train», Said DJ Waldiney, while shaking his Gregory Isaacs t-shirt because he was celebrating July 15th the birthday of the« Cool Ruler »of reggae.

He added that another song that also surprised Stephens when he heard it performed at the club was by Yvonne Sterling. Full of music, which, by the way, was also the first full length album he bought decades ago.

“Imagine, in 2015. Richie and I were talking about this song, then in 2020 the people of São Luís were able to organize a fundraiser for Yvonne Sterling. We had planned to bring him with Richie to perform in Brazil. I was devastated when I heard that she had passed away, ”he added.

REGGAE DANCE

The Brazilians also created their own reggae dance, called the agarradinho, which DJ Waldiney was happy to share is now considered cultural heritage.

“A few decades ago Brazilians danced salsa and merengue, but when reggae music came in the mid-1970s we didn’t know how to dance it, so we made our own steps. And so over the years, in every club you go to, you can see the couples dancing side by side, ”he said. The Sunday Gleaner.

“The way we dance reggae music in São Luís is different. We call the dance “agarradinho” because we dance together to the beat. Agarradinho means together or very close, and it is in the process of being recognized as intangible cultural heritage, and this will only be possible thanks to the existence of reggae music in the world, ”he shared enthusiastically.

Oral traditions, performing arts, local knowledge and traditional skills are all considered intangible heritage. In November 2018, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization designated reggae music as “intangible cultural heritage of humanity”.

It was in 2018 that the government of São Luís opened the Museo do Reggae Maranhão, the first reggae-themed museum outside of Jamaica, with the aim of preserving reggae culture. Reports indicate that in the first year of operation, the museum received 50,000 visitors.

yasmine.peru@gleanerjm.com


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VP Records Celebrates “A Reggae Music Journey” Pop-Up Exhibition at Jamaican Consulate in New York https://reggae-shack.com/vp-records-celebrates-a-reggae-music-journey-pop-up-exhibition-at-jamaican-consulate-in-new-york/ https://reggae-shack.com/vp-records-celebrates-a-reggae-music-journey-pop-up-exhibition-at-jamaican-consulate-in-new-york/#respond Sun, 16 Feb 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/vp-records-celebrates-a-reggae-music-journey-pop-up-exhibition-at-jamaican-consulate-in-new-york/ A large number of Jamaicans and friends of the island came out on Friday evening to attend the opening of the pop-up exhibition “A Reggae Music Journey” on the occasion of Reggae Month in February, at the Jamaican Consulate in New York. . The exhibition is a historical presentation documenting the history of the Jamaican […]]]>


A large number of Jamaicans and friends of the island came out on Friday evening to attend the opening of the pop-up exhibition “A Reggae Music Journey” on the occasion of Reggae Month in February, at the Jamaican Consulate in New York. .

The exhibition is a historical presentation documenting the history of the Jamaican musical genre and is organized in collaboration with the producers VP Records.

The pop-up features artifacts including historic vinyl records from the Van Pelt collection, and a platinum sale award for Sean Paul’s Dutty Rock LP presented to company president Randy Chin.

In declaring the exhibit open, Jamaican Consul General in New York, Alsion Wilson, said the Jamaican Consulate is honored to join the rest of the world in celebrating Reggae Month.

“This exhibition over the next three weeks will provide Jamaicans and friends of Jamaica the opportunity to see and have a better understanding and appreciation of the genesis and development of Reggae music,” Wilson said.

“Since its birth, reggae music has given voice to the voiceless and provided many opportunities for Jamaicans from diverse socio-economic backgrounds to leave a lasting legacy both in Jamaica and around the world,” Consul said. Jamaican general.

She pointed out that “reggae music has left an important mark on the world. This is evidenced by the designation by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to add Reggae music to the list of intangible cultural heritage of humanity in 2018. ”

She highlighted the recent success of “young sensation Mikayla Simpson, also known as Koffee, who last Sunday became the youngest and first female reggae artist to win the Grammy Award for Best Reggae Album. It is a testament to the determination and strong will that we as Jamaicans have to be successful ”.

“The Month of Reggae was launched in 2008. Here we are 12 years later, hosting the first reggae music exhibition which I know will definitely not be the last,” she said.

In her remarks, VP Records co-founder Patricia Chin told the general public that the exhibit chronicles the company’s more than 40 years of activity in the United States and its more than sixty years of activity in Jamaica.

She told him that the family believed it was very important to give Jamaicans the opportunity to see VP’s contribution to the safeguarding and maintenance of Reggae music.

Photos of Winston Rodney

An eight-panel display tells the story of the label stretching back to its origins as Vincent and Patricia Chin’s Randy’s Record Mart in Kingston in the late 1950s, spanning to the present day and featuring its 40 years of existence in Jamaica, Queens and New York. The story of the company’s global impact and continued relevance is woven into the history of reggae itself.

Some of the genre’s most admired artists including Dennis Brown, Gregory Isaacs, Beres Hammond, Barrington Levy, Garnett Silk, Lady Saw and Freddie McGregor – who have either had key releases distributed through VP Records or signed with VP Records – are featured in the exhibition as well.

The exhibition features the work of photographers David Corio, Anders Jones, Wonder Knack, Jonathan Mannion and Martei Korley.

On February 6, the birthday of reggae icon Bob Marley, the Consulate will live stream the anniversary celebrations of the Bob Marley Museum on Hope Road in Kingston.

On February 21, The Reggae Music Journey exhibit will move from the Consulate to the newly renovated VP Records retail store in Queens.


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Reggae music exhibition opens at Jamaican Consulate in New York https://reggae-shack.com/reggae-music-exhibition-opens-at-jamaican-consulate-in-new-york/ Wed, 05 Feb 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/reggae-music-exhibition-opens-at-jamaican-consulate-in-new-york/ VP Records Co-Founder Ms. Patricia Chin presents a collection of VP Records to Jamaican Consul General Ms. Alsion Wilson last Friday at the opening of the VP Records exhibit titled: A Reggae Music Journey at the Jamaican Consulate in New York. From left to right are VP Records VP Business Development Richard Lue, Mr. Christopher […]]]>


VP Records Co-Founder Ms. Patricia Chin presents a collection of VP Records to Jamaican Consul General Ms. Alsion Wilson last Friday at the opening of the VP Records exhibit titled: A Reggae Music Journey at the Jamaican Consulate in New York. From left to right are VP Records VP Business Development Richard Lue, Mr. Christopher Chin and VP Marketing and Sales VP Aaron Talbert. (Photo Derrick Scott)

by Derrick Scott

NEW YORKA large number of Jamaicans and friends of Jamaica came out on Friday evening (January 31) to attend the opening of “A reggae music journey»Pop-up exhibition on the occasion of Reggae Month in February, at the Jamaican Consulate in New York.

The exhibition, ‘A reggae music journey‘is a historical exhibition documenting the history of the Jamaican musical genre and is organized in collaboration with VP Records.

It features artifacts including historic vinyl records from the Van Pelt collection, and a platinum sale award for Sean Paul’s Dutty Rock LP awarded to company president Randy Chin.

In declaring the exhibit open, Jamaican Consul General in New York, Ms Alsion Wilson, said the Jamaican Consulate is honored to join the rest of the world in celebrating Reggae Month. “This exhibition over the next three weeks will provide Jamaicans and friends of Jamaica the opportunity to see and have a better understanding and appreciation of the genesis and development of Reggae music,” said Ms. Wilson.

“Since its birth, reggae music has empowered the voiceless and provided many opportunities for Jamaicans from diverse socio-economic backgrounds to leave a lasting legacy both in Jamaica and around the world,” Consul said. Jamaican general.

She went on to point out that “reggae music has left an important mark on the world. This is evidenced by the designation by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to add Reggae music to the list of intangible cultural heritage of humanity in 2018. ”

She highlighted the recent success of “young sensation Mikayla Simpson, also known as Koffee, who last Sunday became the youngest and first female reggae artist to win the Grammy Award for Best Reggae Album. of the determination and strong will that we as Jamaicans have to be successful. ”

“The Month of Reggae was first launched in 2008. Here we are 12 years later, hosting the first reggae music exhibition which I know will definitely not be the last,” she said. .

In her remarks, VP Records co-founder Ms. Patricia Chin told the general public that the exhibit chronicles over 40 years of operating VP Records in the United States and over sixty years of operation. in Jamaica.

She said her family believed it was very important to give Jamaicans the opportunity to see VP’s contribution to the preservation and development of reggae music.

An eight panel display tells the story of the label stretching back to its origins as Vincent and Patricia Chin’s Randy’s Record Mart in Kingston in the late 1950s, spanning to the present day and featuring its 40 years of existence in Jamaica, in Queens. The story of the company’s global impact and continued relevance is embedded in the history of reggae itself.

Reggae music exhibition opens at Jamaican Consulate in New York

VP Records Co-Founder Ms. Patricia Chin explains the concept of the reggae music exhibition to Jamaican Consul General Ms. Alsion Wilson and Jamaica’s Permanent Representative to the United Nations Ambassador, Carl Rattray, at the opening last Friday of the VP Records exhibition entitled: A Reggae Music Journey. at the Jamaican Consulate in New York. (Photo Derrick Scott)

Some of the genre’s most admired artists including Dennis Brown, Gregory Isaacs, Beres Hammond, Barrington Levy, Garnett Silk, Lady Saw and Freddie McGregor – who have had key releases distributed by VP Records or signed with VP Records – are featured in the exhibition too. The exhibition features the work of photographers David Corio, Anders Jones, Wonder Knack, Jonathan Mannion, Martei Korley and others.

On February 6, the birthday of reggae icon Bob Marley, the Consulate will live stream the Bob Marley Museum’s birthday celebrations on Hope Road.

On February 21, The Reggae Music Journey exhibit will run from the Consulate to the newly renovated VP Records retail store in Jamaica Queens.


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Jamaican Consulate in New York hosts reggae music exhibition https://reggae-shack.com/jamaican-consulate-in-new-york-hosts-reggae-music-exhibition/ https://reggae-shack.com/jamaican-consulate-in-new-york-hosts-reggae-music-exhibition/#respond Fri, 31 Jan 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/jamaican-consulate-in-new-york-hosts-reggae-music-exhibition/ To celebrate Reggae Month, the Jamaican Consulate General in New York, in collaboration with VP Records, will host a pop-up exhibition titled “A reggae music journey” at the consulate from February 1 to 21, during Reggae Month. The exhibition, “A journey of reggae music” is a landmark exhibit documenting the history of the Jamaican musical […]]]>


To celebrate Reggae Month, the Jamaican Consulate General in New York, in collaboration with VP Records, will host a pop-up exhibition titled “A reggae music journey” at the consulate from February 1 to 21, during Reggae Month.

The exhibition, “A journey of reggae music” is a landmark exhibit documenting the history of the Jamaican musical genre and will feature artifacts including historic vinyl records from the Van Pelt collection, and a platinum sale award for Sean Paul’s Duty Rock LP introduced to company president Randy Chin.

A Reggae Music Journey was created to document the legacy of Reggae music and the role that the Chin family, through Randy’s Record Mart in Jamaica and later VP Records contributed to the development of the genre.

Eight panel display tells the story of the label from its origins as Vincent and Patricia Chin’s Randy’s Record Mart in Kingston in the late 1950s, spanning to the present day and showcasing its 40th anniversary of existence in Jamaica, in Queens. The story of the company’s global impact and continued relevance is woven into the history of reggae itself.

Some of the genre’s most admired artists including Dennis Brown, Gregory Isaacs, Beres Hammond, Barrington Levy, Garnett Silk, Lady Saw and Freddie McGregor – who have had key releases distributed by VP Records or signed with VP Records – are featured in the exhibition too. The exhibition features the work of photographers David Corio, Anders Jones, Wonder Knack, Jonathan Mannion, Martei Korley and others.

Jamaican Consul General in New York, Ms Alsion Wilson, said the Consulate is very happy to join Jamaica and the rest of the world in celebrating Reggae Month. She said staging this exhibit will give Jamaicans and Friends of Jamaica the opportunity to see this important exhibit.

Ms. Wilson stressed that Reggae Month is of great importance because Jamaican music has been an important part of our culture, a source of Jamaican recognition on the world stage.

She said that on February 6, the birthday of reggae icon Bob Marley, the consulate would live stream the Bob Marley Museum’s birthday celebrations on Hope Road.

In 2018, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO, added reggae to its list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, as a worthy cultural institution. protected and preserved.

In a press release published on its website, UNESCO said of Reggae: “His contribution to international discourse on issues of injustice, resistance, love and humanity underscores the element’s dynamics as being at once cerebral, socio-political, sensual and spiritual. The basic social functions of music – as a vehicle for social commentary, cathartic practice, and a way of praising God – have not changed, and music continues to act as a voice for all.

In 2008, the government of Jamaica declared February as Reggae Month, to mark and celebrate the impact of the musical genre on the socio-economic development of the country.

At the launch event on Friday January 31, VP Records plans to broadcast live their weekly “Happy Hour” music from 5 p.m. – 6 p.m. and provide a DJ of 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. For the reception.

The Reggae Music Journey exhibit will run from the Consulate to the newly renovated VP Records retail store in Jamaica Queens.

Source: Jamaican Consulate in New York


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Jamaican Consulate in New York hosts reggae music exhibition https://reggae-shack.com/jamaican-consulate-in-new-york-hosts-reggae-music-exhibition-3/ Thu, 30 Jan 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/jamaican-consulate-in-new-york-hosts-reggae-music-exhibition-3/ Consul General of Jamaica in New York Ms Alsion Wilson by Derrick Scott NEW YORK – To celebrate Reggae Month, the Jamaican Consulate General in New York, in collaboration with VP Records, will host a pop-up exhibition titled “A reggae music journey»At the consulate from January 31st to February 21, during Reggae Month. The exhibition, […]]]>


Consul General of Jamaica in New York Ms Alsion Wilson

by Derrick Scott

NEW YORK – To celebrate Reggae Month, the Jamaican Consulate General in New York, in collaboration with VP Records, will host a pop-up exhibition titled “A reggae music journey»At the consulate from January 31st to February 21, during Reggae Month.

The exhibition, ‘A reggae music journey‘is a landmark exhibit documenting the history of the Jamaican music genre and will feature artifacts including historic vinyl records from the Van Pelt collection, and a platinum sale award for Sean Paul’s Dutty Rock LP presented to the president of the company Randy Chin.

A reggae music journey was created to document the legacy of Reggae music and the role that the Chin family, through Randy’s Record Mart in Jamaica and later, Vice-president files have contributed to the development of the genre.

An eight panel display tells the story of the label stretching back to its origins as Vincent and Patricia Chin’s Randy’s Record Mart in Kingston in the late 1950s, spanning to the present day and featuring its 40 years of existence in Jamaica, in Queens.

The story of the company’s global impact and continued relevance is embedded in the history of reggae itself.

Some of the genre’s most admired artists including Dennis Brown, Gregory Isaacs, Beres Hammond, Barrington Levy, Garnett Silk, Lady Saw and Freddie McGregor – who have had key releases distributed by VP Records or signed with VP Records – are featured in the exhibition too.

The exhibition features the work of photographers David Corio, Anders Jones, Wonder Knack, Jonathan Mannion, Martei Korley and others.

Jamaican Consul General in New York, Ms Alsion Wilson, said the Consulate is very happy to join Jamaica and the rest of the world in celebrating Reggae Month. She said staging this exhibit will give Jamaicans and friends of Jamaica the opportunity to see this important exhibit.

Ms. Wilson stressed that Reggae Month is of great importance because Jamaican music has been an important part of our culture, a source of Jamaican recognition on the world stage.

She said that on February 6, the birthday of reggae icon Bob Marley, the consulate will live stream the Bob Marley Museum’s birthday celebrations on Hope Road.

In 2018, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO, added reggae to its list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, as a worthy cultural institution. protected and preserved.

In a statement on its website, UNESCO said about reggae: “Its contribution to international discourse on issues of injustice, resistance, love and humanity underscores the dynamic of the element as being at the same time cerebral, socio-political, sensual and spiritual. The basic social functions of music – as a vehicle for social commentary, cathartic practice, and a way of praising God – have not changed, and music continues to act as a voice for all.

In 2008, the government of Jamaica declared February as Reggae Month, to mark and celebrate the impact of the musical genre on the socio-economic development of the country.

At the launch event on Friday, January 31, VP Records plans to broadcast their weekly “Happy Hour” music live from 5 to 6 p.m. and to provide a DJ from 6 to 8 p.m. for the reception.

The Reggae Music Journey exhibit will run from the Consulate to the newly renovated VP Records retail store in Jamaica Queens.


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Jamaican Consulate in New York hosts reggae music exhibition https://reggae-shack.com/jamaican-consulate-in-new-york-hosts-reggae-music-exhibition-2/ https://reggae-shack.com/jamaican-consulate-in-new-york-hosts-reggae-music-exhibition-2/#respond Wed, 29 Jan 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/jamaican-consulate-in-new-york-hosts-reggae-music-exhibition-2/ Consul General of Jamaica in New York, Ms. Alsion Wilson NEW YORK – To celebrate Reggae Month, the Consulate General of Jamaica in New York, in collaboration with VP Records, will host a pop-up exhibition titled “A Reggae Music Journey” at the Consulate from February 1 to 21, during Reggae Month . The ‘A Reggae […]]]>


Consul General of Jamaica in New York, Ms. Alsion Wilson

NEW YORK – To celebrate Reggae Month, the Consulate General of Jamaica in New York, in collaboration with VP Records, will host a pop-up exhibition titled “A Reggae Music Journey” at the Consulate from February 1 to 21, during Reggae Month .

The ‘A Reggae Music Journey’ exhibit is a landmark exhibit documenting the history of the Jamaican music genre and will feature artifacts including historic vinyl records from the Van Pelt collection, and a platinum sale award for Sean Paul’s Dutty Rock LP introduced to company president Randy Chin.

A Reggae Music Journey was created to document the legacy of Reggae music and the role that the Chin family, through Randy’s Record Mart in Jamaica and later VP Records contributed to the development of the genre.

– Advertising –

Eight panel display tells the story of the label from its origins as Vincent and Patricia Chin’s Randy’s Record Mart in Kingston in the late 1950s, spanning to the present day and showcasing its 40th anniversary of existence in Jamaica, in Queens. The story of the company’s global impact and continued relevance is woven into the history of reggae itself.

Some of the genre’s most admired artists including Dennis Brown, Gregory Isaacs, Beres Hammond, Barrington Levy, Garnett Silk, Lady Saw and Freddie McGregor – who have had key releases distributed by VP Records or signed with VP Records – are featured in the exhibition too. The exhibition features the work of photographers David Corio, Anders Jones, Wonder Knack, Jonathan Mannion, Martei Korley and others.

Jamaican Consul General in New York, Ms Alsion Wilson, said the Consulate is very happy to join Jamaica and the rest of the world in celebrating Reggae Month. She said staging this exhibit will give Jamaicans and Friends of Jamaica the opportunity to see this important exhibit.

Ms. Wilson stressed that Reggae Month is of great importance because Jamaican music has been an important part of our culture, a source of Jamaican recognition on the world stage.

She said that on February 6, the birthday of reggae icon Bob Marley, the consulate would live stream the Bob Marley Museum’s birthday celebrations on Hope Road.

In 2018, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO, added reggae to its list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, as a worthy cultural institution. protected and preserved.

In a statement on its website, UNESCO said about reggae: “Its contribution to international discourse on issues of injustice, resistance, love and humanity underscores the dynamic of the element as being at the same time cerebral, socio-political, sensual and spiritual. The basic social functions of music – as a vehicle for social commentary, cathartic practice, and a way of praising God – have not changed, and music continues to act as a voice for all.

In 2008, the government of Jamaica declared February as Reggae Month, to mark and celebrate the impact of the musical genre on the socio-economic development of the country.

At the launch event on Friday, January 31, VP Records plans to broadcast live their weekly “Happy Hour” music from 5 to 6 p.m. and provide a DJ from 6 to 8 p.m. for the reception.

The Reggae Music Journey exhibit will run from the Consulate to the newly renovated VP Records retail store in Jamaica Queens.

Advertising


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Julian ‘Jingles’ Reynolds | The true history of Reggae music [Part 2] | On point https://reggae-shack.com/julian-jingles-reynolds-the-true-history-of-reggae-music-part-2-on-point/ Sun, 17 Feb 2019 08:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/julian-jingles-reynolds-the-true-history-of-reggae-music-part-2-on-point/ The start of the reggae journey was extremely difficult for those who did. A significant block was broadcast on the two existing radio stations, RJR and JBC. It took acts of force by young ‘Turks’ producing and supporting music, led by activists, namely, record producers Bunny’ Striker ‘Lee, Prince Buster, Allan’ Skill ‘Cole, Lloyd’ One […]]]>


The start of the reggae journey was extremely difficult for those who did. A significant block was broadcast on the two existing radio stations, RJR and JBC.

It took acts of force by young ‘Turks’ producing and supporting music, led by activists, namely, record producers Bunny’ Striker ‘Lee, Prince Buster, Allan’ Skill ‘Cole, Lloyd’ One Foot Jimmy ‘Radway, members of The Wailers, along with their supporters, threatened directors and radio presenters with bodily harm if their records were not released. It was sound systems all over Jamaica that accepted and gave reggae music their first exposure.

Even within journalism and the music industry, I remember the exchanges in The Star I had with my colleague and friend the late musician and journalist Sonny Bradshaw about the importance of giving maximum exposure to the new form. Jamaican art, reggae.

Sonny, in his ‘Musicman’ column, saw it differently from me. My point went into the business itself because my friends who operated arguably the most popular ‘nightclub’ of the time, Merritone nightclub, were offended that I challenged them in both SWING and in my reviews in The Star and The Gleaner of playing too much foreign music, soul, and R&B, and not more local music, namely reggae, ska and rocksteady.

Another obstacle to reggae then was the deeply rooted racism and classism that permeates Jamaican society to this day. Reggae came from the bowels of the Jamaican working class and peasants, fully identifiable with Rastafari, a movement born from the same societal levels.

‘BURRU-BURRU MUSIC’

I remember a conservative-leaning family member, a policeman, expressing his pride in reading my articles on music but dismissing “the black man wasting his time with this burru burru music”, and asking if I saw others like the “Chinese, Indian, and white man wasting their time chasing this as a way to make money.” It was in 1969.

It must have been a very moving moment and a sense of accomplishment that Minister Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange experienced as she sat at the meeting of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization ( UNESCO) in Mauritius, off the coast of East Africa, witness to the organization voting for reggae music to be protected and added to its list of cultural heritage, declaring it a world cultural treasure.

She was there as a teenager when music was being created among the youth of Kingston.

Produced in West Kingston, Babsy met with her contemporaries at the Chocomo Lawn Youth Club and Dancehall on Wellington Street under the direction of former Prime Minister Edward Seaga.

Chocomo was one of Kingston’s nodes for the emergence of Jamaican music, producing artists like The Techniques and The Uniques.

Grange was coming full circle, now being the Minister of Culture, Entertainment and Sports, spearheading this historic achievement for Jamaican culture.

If circumstances were less busy in Mauritius, it would have been appropriate to see Jimmy Cliff, Derrick Harriott, Bunny Lee or representatives of the families of Arthur ‘Duke’ Reid, Clement ‘Coxsone’ Dodd, Vincent ‘Randy’ Chin, Sonia Pottinger , and Byron Lee and Neville Lee – pioneers of the Jamaican music industry – accompany him.

And now? Although largely symbolic, this recognition by UNESCO can serve as a powerful promotional tool to attract more revenue to Jamaican coffers.

I have long tried to convey to Jamaican governments and the private sector, through my writings and projects submitted as an entrepreneur, that the country has enormous potential for income through its creative industries, primarily music and film.

References have been made to the United States, which has valued and invested heavily in its creative industries to make it, for several decades, among the six largest net incomes of the American economy – up there with agriculture, l automotive, pharmaceuticals, energy, aviation, and aerospace. Not only were their creations – literature, film, television, and music – winning big, but they were also the primary tools for spreading American culture and values ​​around the world.

REGGAE WORKING GROUP

Jamaica must now prioritize reggae and the creative industries that flow from it to increase income generation. Financial institutions must give up their risk aversion to funding the creative industries.

During a recent meeting with JAMPRO, I learned that they led a delegation of potential Jamaican financiers a few months ago on an outreach trip to Hollywood and Las Vegas to better understand how the financing of the film and entertainment industries. This is an important development.

I would further suggest a task force – led by the Prime Minister, Minister of Finance and Minister of Culture, and comprising financial and creative industry leaders such as Michael Lee Chin, Chris Blackwell, Marlene Street Forrest, Sandra Glasgow, Keith Duncan, Jimmy Cliff, Michael ‘Ibo’ Cooper and Diane Edwards – be instituted to stimulate investment in creative industry projects. Capital must come from the IDB, the World Bank, the BDC and other multilateral organizations to invest in the creative industries.

There are several creative projects that can be beneficial in improving socio-economic conditions in Jamaica, but they are rejected by financial institutions because they emanate from unconventional classes who have no history with the financial establishment.

The two most important historical nodes for reggae are Orange (Beat) Street – where the business was centered, record stores operated, deals made and funds transferred; and Trench Town, where most of the singer and songwriter talent lived. Target them for investments.

Reggae has demonstrated its power and value internationally, generating substantial income from record sales, copyright publishing and live performances, allowing many Jamaicans to enjoy a better quality of life.

The great Rastafarian leader and visionary Sam Brown said: “The black man in his quest for freedom has passed through many doors.

Reggae music is certainly one of those doors to socio-economic freedom.

– Julian ‘Jingles’ Reynolds is President of the Sounds & Pressure Foundation in downtown Kingston, novelist (“A Reason For Living”) and documentary maker. Email your comments to column@gleanerjm.com and sound_pressure@yahoo.com.


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Julian ‘Jingles’ Reynolds | The true history of reggae music [Part I] | On point https://reggae-shack.com/julian-jingles-reynolds-the-true-history-of-reggae-music-part-i-on-point/ Sun, 10 Feb 2019 08:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/julian-jingles-reynolds-the-true-history-of-reggae-music-part-i-on-point/ See on the Internet the elation and expression of satisfaction of people around Culture Minister Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange as the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) meets in Mauritius off the coast of East Africa has officially recognized reggae music as an “intangible cultural heritage” born in Jamaica and deemed worthy of “protection […]]]>


See on the Internet the elation and expression of satisfaction of people around Culture Minister Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange as the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) meets in Mauritius off the coast of East Africa has officially recognized reggae music as an “intangible cultural heritage” born in Jamaica and deemed worthy of “protection and promotion”, as described in Al-Jazeera News, I did I couldn’t help but reflect on all those who have contributed, sacrificed and have been fulfilled by this tremendous cultural treasure.

And even to get to this point on Thursday, November 29, Minister Grange had to come forward with strength and her team to the UNESCO meeting, firmly asking that the issue then be voted on and not delayed for two years. The report in The Gleaner said the Jamaican vote was strongly supported by Cuba, Senegal and Palestine, soon supported by almost all countries present.

This is a testament to the universality of reggae music, and the fact that it took place off the African coast must bring great satisfaction to Rastafari brothers and sisters around the world.

It was particularly gratifying to see the emphasis placed by Minister Grange, in a press release from Mauritius, on the major contribution of the Rastafarian movement to reggae.

From my perspective in the late 1960s – particularly in 1968 when ‘reggae’ became identifiable as a genre of Jamaican music – the influence of Rastafarian, its emphasis on Africa, peace and the love, the uniqueness of the “black man”, the universality of humanity, spirituality, creativity and the endless struggle for equal rights and justice for the destitute peoples of the world, was unquestionable and direct.

Rastafari’s preaching and teachings gave the youth of Jamaica a moral compass. Alumni such as Mortimo Planno, Count Ossie, Sam Clayton, Sam Brown, Philbert Alvaranga, Douglas Mack and Ras Michael have been integral in this emergence of a musical art form with a broad social and moral conscience, shouting against injustice. It coincided with the worldwide phenomenon of the civil rights movement in the United States, towards the African and Asian nations struggling for their independence, free from colonial rule and subjugation.

FIRST RECORDINGS

As a young journalist, I had chosen a path by paying close attention to what was emerging in Jamaica by writing about the cultural journeys of urban Jamaican youth, primarily Kingstonians – the young men and women who published this new, beautiful and poignant art form called reggae music.

I had taken over a weekly column, Record Shop, which appeared in the Friday STAR Weekend, which only spoke of popular music and British, American and European artists. However, when I suggested to my editors, the late Jack Anderson and Barbara Gloudon, OJ, what I wanted to do, they didn’t hesitate, giving me the go-ahead. Record Shop has become a must read for many across Jamaica.

I also wrote articles in The STAR about the young talents who were bringing this unique music – singers, musicians, producers and engineers – and wrote the weekly column in The Gleaner, ‘Merry Go Round’, covering the live shows in the clubs. , concerts, plays, art exhibitions and other cultural prices.

The first recordings of “reggae” songs came out in 1968:

– Nanny Goat by Larry Marshall, recorded on the Studio One / Coxsone label, produced by the late Clement ‘Coxsone’ ‘Downbeat’ Dodd;

– Do The Reggay, performed by Toots Hibbert and The Maytals and produced by the late Leslie Kong on his Beverly’s Records label;

– Israelites, performed by the late Desmond Dekker and the Aces, produced by Leslie Kong on the Beverly’s Records label;

– Love Me Forever by Carlton and the Shoes on the Studio One label;

– Feel The Rhythm, recorded and produced by the late Clancy Eccles on his Clandisc label.

They are the flagship of the “reggae” musical genre.

The untouchable Lee ‘Scratch’ ‘The Upsetter’ Perry and his band Upsetters, with Aston ‘Family Man’ Barrett, the late Carlton Barrett, Glen Adams, Lloyd Charmers, Alva Lewis and Earl ‘Wire’ Lindo, from 1968 with ‘ People Funny Boy ‘, regularly produced reggae gems.

THE ROLE OF THE MEDIA

I first discovered the word ‘Reggay’ in 1967 on the B side of a 45 rpm. It was an instrumental by Tommy McCook & the Supersonics on the Treasure Isle label, produced by the late Arthur ‘Duke’ Reid. The source of the word itself is uncertain. Two important anecdotes were that it came from “streggae” – a cowardly female, and “ragga” – from ragamuffin.

The media, especially entertainment journalists such as the late G. Fitz Bartley, the late Tony Laing, Jackie Estick, Clifton Segree, Tony Berry and more recently Bob West, are an overlooked and unrecognized, but major contributor to the development of reggae. Balford Henry, the late T. Boots Harris and Ras Basil Walters.

SWING magazine, the “Reggae Bible,” published by Johnny Golding and the Golding family of Golding Printing Service’s fame, with passion and conviction, brought reggae to the Jamaican entertainment populace, and, arguably, was the first to put the name “reggae” on paper.

Bartley, Laing and I wrote for both The star and SWING. SWING has also nurtured talented young writers and poets such as Norma Hamilton and Mutabaruka, among others. Journalists in the entertainment print media were cherished by singers and musicians because it was their only medium of exposure in what they called an “article.”

I have developed friendships with several artists, including Bob Marley and The Wailers, Bob Andy, The Heptones, The Melodians, Alton Ellis, Ken Boothe, Dennis Brown, Rita Marley, Judy Mowatt, Marcia Griffiths, BB Seaton, for n ‘to name a few, because of the “reviews” I gave them early in their careers.

Recently a reporter reminded me as a teenager he remembered reading an article I wrote about The Wailers in The Weekend Star, comparing Bob Marley and The Wailers to Sly & the Family Stone, The Beatles, the Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan. He said a friend of his, when they gathered in their corner to read the article, called my predictions for the Wailers “nonsense.”

While researching recently, I found the article “Wailers on Rough Road to Success” which appeared on February 6, 1970, the day Bob Marley was born. I can just imagine the special feeling of joy he must have felt.

– Julian ‘Jingles’ Reynolds is president of the Sounds & Pressure Foundation in downtown Kingston, novelist (‘A Reason For Living’) and documentary filmmaker. Email your comments to column@gleanerjm.com and sound_pressure@yahoo.com.


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Reggae, music “of love and humanity”, obtains the list of cultures of the UN https://reggae-shack.com/reggae-music-of-love-and-humanity-obtains-the-list-of-cultures-of-the-un/ Fri, 30 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/reggae-music-of-love-and-humanity-obtains-the-list-of-cultures-of-the-un/ (FILES) In this file photo taken on February 8, 2009, a man pedals past a mural of the late musician Bob Marley in Kingston. – Reggae music, whose cold, singing grooves have gained international fame thanks to artists like Bob Marley, on November 29, 2018, secured a coveted place on the United Nations list of […]]]>


(FILES) In this file photo taken on February 8, 2009, a man pedals past a mural of the late musician Bob Marley in Kingston. – Reggae music, whose cold, singing grooves have gained international fame thanks to artists like Bob Marley, on November 29, 2018, secured a coveted place on the United Nations list of world cultural treasures. AFP PHOTO

Port Louis, Mauritius | AFP | Jamaican reggae, the music of the oppressed that Bob Marley catapulted onto the world stage, on Thursday won a coveted spot on the United Nations list of global cultural treasures.

UNESCO, the cultural and scientific agency of the world body, has added reggae to its collection of “intangible cultural heritage” deemed worthy of protection and promotion, along with two dozen other traditions from around the world.

“It’s a historic day. We are very, very happy, ”enthusiastic Jamaican Minister of Culture Olivia Grange, speaking by phone from Mauritius where registrations were announced.

“Everywhere you go and say you’re from Jamaica, they say ‘Bob Marley’,” said Grange, adding that the distinction “underscores the importance of our culture and our music, whose theme and message is “a love, a unity and a peace.”

UNESCO noted that while reggae started out as “the voice of the marginalized”, it was “now played and adopted by a wide range of society, including various genres, ethnic and religious groups”.

Its “contribution to the international discourse on issues of injustice, resistance, love and humanity underscores the dynamics of the element as being at the same time cerebral, socio-political, sensual and spiritual,” added UNESCO based in Paris in a press release.

UNESCO is best known for its prestigious World Heritage list of outstanding cultural and natural sites, which include the Grand Canyon, the Great Wall of China and the Old City of Jerusalem.

Its list of intangible cultural heritage includes hundreds of traditions from all over the world, some of which are hardly known beyond the borders of the country who wish to have it recognized.

Although largely symbolic, the listing can serve to raise the profile of the country and the practice.

Other additions on Thursday included the ancient Irish sport of hurling, the spring rituals of Kazakh horse breeders including the consumption of fermented mare’s milk, and the Polish tradition of creating sparkling Christmas cribs.

“This is a special moment for all those who care about taking care of Polish heritage,” tweeted Culture Minister Piotr Glinski.

The Irish Gaelic Athletics Association (GAA) hailed the honor bestowed on hurling, a fastball game played with carved wooden sticks that is the subject of fan crowds across the country.

“He reaffirms the fact that hurling is more than just a sport. It is a national treasure; an ancient tradition that connects us to our Celtic past and part of our DNA, ”said GAA President John Horan.

– Hope to the oppressed –

Reggae emerged in the late 1960s from Jamaican ska and rocksteady styles, also drawing inspiration from American jazz and blues.

It quickly became popular in the United States as well as in Britain, where many Jamaican immigrants had settled in the post-war years.

The style is often championed as music for the oppressed, with lyrics addressing socio-political issues, imprisonment and inequality.

Reggae also became associated with Rastafarianism, which deified former Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie and promoted the sacramental use of ganja, or marijuana.

Jérôme Levasseur, director of the Bagnols Reggae Festival in the south of France, said he expected the award to help “normalize” a musical form that has always been somewhat marginalized due to its “smell of cannabis and libertarian revolt “.

Toots and the Maytals’ 1968 single “Do the Reggay” was the first popular song to use the term reggae.

Marley and his band the Wailers then rose to fame on classic hits such as “No Woman, No Cry” and “Stir It Up”.

Peter Tosh, a key member of the Wailers, established a successful solo career with hits such as “Legalize It”, while Desmond Dekker also enjoyed international success with the song “Israelites”.

Toots and the Maytals rose to prominence with “Pressure Drop” and Jimmy Cliff became an international sensation with “The Harder They Come”, also the title of a 1972 film in which he starred.

The reggae sound, with its heavy bass lines and drums, has influenced countless artists and inspired many genres, including reggaeton, dub and dancehall.

Regular beats and flowing grooves have also proven to be essential in hip-hop: Sister Nancy’s anthem “Bam Bam”, for example, has been heavily sampled by superstars like Kanye West, Lauryn Hill, Chris Brown and Jay- Z.



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UN Adds Reggae Music to List of International Cultural Treasures | Reggae https://reggae-shack.com/un-adds-reggae-music-to-list-of-international-cultural-treasures-reggae/ Thu, 29 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/un-adds-reggae-music-to-list-of-international-cultural-treasures-reggae/ The United Nations has added reggae music to its list of international cultural treasures worthy of protection and promotion. Jamaica asked for recognition of its musical tradition at a UN meeting in Mauritius this year. “It is music that we have created and that has penetrated all corners of the world,” said the country’s Minister […]]]>


The United Nations has added reggae music to its list of international cultural treasures worthy of protection and promotion.

Jamaica asked for recognition of its musical tradition at a UN meeting in Mauritius this year. “It is music that we have created and that has penetrated all corners of the world,” said the country’s Minister of Culture, Olivia Grange.

BBC Radio 1Xtra presenter Dave Rodigan said: “Unesco’s announcement is fantastic news for reggae, which has traditionally spoken out for the underprivileged while offering hope for a world in which the love and respect are paramount.

To mark the inscription of reggae on the representative list of the intangible cultural heritage of humanity, Unesco – the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization – declared: “[Reggae’s] contribution to the international discourse on issues of injustice, resistance, love and humanity underlines the dynamics of the element as being at the same time cerebral, socio-political, sensual and spiritual.

The function of music “as a vehicle for social commentary, a cathartic practice and a means of praising God” had not changed since its emergence from the Caribbean in the late 1960s, Unesco said.

Reggae artist Hollie cook said politicians could take inspiration from reggae’s “strong message of peace, love and unity” and described its cultural impact as “a great example of how immigration has a big and positive effect in our society. Maybe some of the leaders of our country can put their pens down, stop spreading fear and blow an Aswad to relax.

Hollie Cook performing at the 2012 Womad Festival. Photograph: C Brandon / Redferns via Getty Images

Post-war immigration from Jamaica led to the genre’s boom in the UK: this year the famous British reggae label Trojan celebrated its 50th anniversary. Laurence Cane-Honeysett, author of The Trojan Records Story, described the UN recognition as an “incredibly positive” gesture. “The impact and influence of gender on a global scale has long been overlooked.

“He made a significant contribution to the development of multiculturalism, with ska, rock regular and reggae of the 60s and early 70s having a markedly positive effect in breaking down social barriers by bringing people of all colors together,” especially in Great Britain.

BBC Radio 6 Music presenter Don Letts told the Guardian the enduring importance of reggae: “If you look at a map of the world, Jamaica is a small island that spent hundreds of years under colonial rule. Ironically, in the 21st century, it has culturally colonized the planet.

“The island’s culture, characterized by its art, language, dance and attitude, continues to capture the imaginations of people around the world. Sound experiments created in Jamaican studios are now part of the fabric of contemporary music. Jamaica is a testament to the power of culture to act as a tool for social change, albeit at the local level. “

Letts said reggae “can take care of itself,” but added, “There is no doubt that Jamaica has not reaped the rewards of its cultural impact, and this is what the island does. really needs. If the UN can fix this, go ahead.

The Unesco list started in 2008, following an international convention for the safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage. He defines what as “the practices, representations, expressions, knowledge, know-how – as well as the instruments, objects, artefacts and cultural spaces associated with them – that communities, groups and, in some cases, individuals recognize as part of their cultural heritage ”.

The objectives of the convention are to safeguard, ensure respect, raise awareness and ensure international cooperation and assistance. Other traditions on this year’s list include dry stone wall art, Slovenian bobbin lace, Georgian chidaoba wrestling, the irish sport of hurling, Poland szopka the tradition of the nativity scene and the traditional festive spring rites of Kazakh horse breeders.

It is distinct from World Heritage List, which designates important physical sites, including the Pyramids of Giza and the Cornish mining landscape.


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