Reggae music – Reggae Shack http://reggae-shack.com/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 18:48:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://reggae-shack.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile-120x120.png Reggae music – Reggae Shack http://reggae-shack.com/ 32 32 Reggae Music, Dancehall, and the Subculture of Violence – Jamaica Observer https://reggae-shack.com/reggae-music-dancehall-and-the-subculture-of-violence-jamaica-observer/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 18:48:03 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/reggae-music-dancehall-and-the-subculture-of-violence-jamaica-observer/ Alton Ellis It is a historical irony that Black History Month and Reggae Month are celebrated in February. Jamaican music can be traced back to mento music, but the importation of the blues after World War II had a profound influence on early urban weekend activity in Kingston and St Andrew and other urban centres. […]]]>

Alton Ellis

It is a historical irony that Black History Month and Reggae Month are celebrated in February. Jamaican music can be traced back to mento music, but the importation of the blues after World War II had a profound influence on early urban weekend activity in Kingston and St Andrew and other urban centres.

The dance ritual is a celebration of life that has served as an antidote to anomie and alienation. The dance and music ritual was integral to the South African liberation struggle and was a cultural catharsis in urban Jamaica of the 1950s and beyond.

Work in a pre-industrial or industrializing society can lead to alienation, and on weekends and even during the week, dances served as a way to let off steam and extrapolate joy from the often harsh realities of life.

The sound system was the instrument that provided the sound and often the dwelling place. Duke Reid and Sir Coxsone’s Downbeat were the two dominant sound systems. There were other sounds like V-Rocket, Lord Koos, King Edward, Tom’s the Great Sebastian, etc. Merritone would emerge at a later date.

From Sir Coxsone’s Downbeat came Studio One and the pioneering efforts to tap into the musical creativity of the Jamaican people. The development of the music must pay homage to Vere Johns who started promoting competition between artists in movie theaters like Palace and Ambassador. At the time, many artists from this pre-independence period imitated well-known American singers like Billy Eckstine, Nat King Cole, Shirley and Lee, Frankie Lyman, etc.

Laurel Aiken is the first Jamaican artist who rejected the imitation of established singers in America. Aiken made a number of tracks in the 1950s and 1960s that were hits. Many other artists followed like Sang and Harriott, Derrick Morgan, Clancy Eccles, Alton Ellis, Dobbie Dobson and Boris Gardiner.

This genre of Jamaican music appeared in the pre-independence period. This contributed greatly to the Jamaican identity that mattered as the country developed politically and sought independence from Britain.

Early music was heavily influenced by American rhythm and blues which promoters like Duke Reid and Downbeat had purchased from the southern regions of the United States. The blues diet included Smiley Lewis, Gene and Eunice, Fats Domino, Dave Bartholomew, Count Archibald, Rosco Gordon, and more. This love of the blues was superimposed on the musical creativity of Jamaican singers and instrumentalists.

There was an aggregation of Jamaican musicians that emerged initially as Studio One Band. These musicians then formed the Skatalites. The Skatalites included many great Jamaican horn blowers, many of whom were products of Alpha Boys’ School. The late trombonist Don Drummond, Tommy McCook, Roland Alphonso, Lester Sterling, Dizzy Johnny Moore, drummer Lloyd Knibb; and Lloyd Brevett, the base player, as well as lead singer Doreen Shaffer. Not all of them were products of the Alpha Boys school. The Skatalites didn’t last long, and despite their genius, many of them struggled to make a living. But the music is immortalized in the albums they made and their multiple support of artists who were part of Sir Coxson’s Downbeat Studio 1 music academy.

This early music focused on non-political lyrics and, like the blues, romantic relationships. This is evident in the early music of The Wailers, Alton Ellis, Derrick Morgan and Delroy Wilson.

The music takes a turn based on the growing influence of the Rastafarian religion. The music of Count Ossie and Mystic Revelations reflected the cultural changes taking place at the base of Jamaican society. Earl Ossie’s band were from the mountains east of Kingston. The band included a saxophonist like Brother Gaynair, Dizzy trumpeter Johnny Moore, trombonist Rico Rodriquez, drummers playing “funde” and Count Ossie featured on the “repeata” drum. The band often took part in dances at Tiverton Road and other venues. The music of Count Ossie and Mystic Revelation brought to light much of the injustices of “Babylon” and reflected a desire for repatriation. Ras Michael in West Kingston also dramatized Rasta drumming and criticism of Jamaican society.

The artist who made an international impact on reggae music was Robert Nesta Marley. From his early writings of original songs and beats like Calm down and I don’t need your love, Marley demonstrated an incredible eye for originality, melody and lyrics. While he rejected the conventional wisdom existing in Jamaica, Marley, Bunny Wailer and Peter Tosh found solace in the protest religion of Rastafari. When Marley came out with the albums Soul Rebel and soul revolutionit was evident that he had undergone a religious and cultural transformation.

Marley was determined to increase his visibility and his reggae music on the world stage. He was creative enough to tweak the music so that reggae beats would become internationally adopted.

Marley’s early albums created a new phase in Jamaican music history. Rather than Jamaica absorbing the external impact of contemporary music, Jamaican artists were forcing the world to embrace the creativity and global consciousness of the small island. The music began with the blues which invaded urban life in Jamaica from North America. The tables turned as Jamaica and reggae music became a musical genre that had a healthy impact on humanity.

Professor Basil ‘Bagga’ Wilson, a former Kingston College varsity star and Manning Cup football player, is a retired Provost of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, USA.

Robert Nesta Marley

Boris Gardiner

Nat King Cole

Don Drummond

DobbyDobson

Derrick Morgan

Duke Reid

Basil Wilson

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Reggae music is alive and well in the UK https://reggae-shack.com/reggae-music-is-alive-and-well-in-the-uk/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 02:33:30 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/reggae-music-is-alive-and-well-in-the-uk/ by Howard Campbell [LONDON] – UK PA coach and broadcaster David Rodigan, declares last week’s success reggae show at the Royal Festival Hall in London, it’s proof that music still has a solid footing in the UK. The April 16 shows, which took place at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., featured Horace Andy, Freddie McGregor […]]]>

by Howard Campbell

[LONDON] – UK PA coach and broadcaster David Rodigan, declares last week’s success reggae show at the Royal Festival Hall in London, it’s proof that music still has a solid footing in the UK.

The April 16 shows, which took place at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., featured Horace Andy, Freddie McGregor and Bitty McLean, backed by the 25-piece Outlook Orchestra. It attracted a capacity of 2,700 spectators.

Freddie McGregor (right) and Bitty McLean backstage at the 16th April reggae show at the Royal Festival Hall in London.

“The show is proof that reggae music, in its traditional form, is alive and well in the UK because we had patrons coming from all over the country,” said Rodigan, who organized the concert for the third time.

Triumphant return

It was a triumphant return after a two-year absence due to Covid-19 lockdowns.

“We chose some of the artists we had worked with before at the Royal Albert Hall and at our first concert at the Royal Festival Hall in 2018, including Bitty McLean, Holly Cook, Kiko Bun and Horseman, who all performed classic songs from the Jamaican songbook, then Horace and Freddie performed their own repertoire,” he added.

Reggae Veterans

Andy and McGregor have had a presence in the UK since the 1970s and 1980s, when the black community included thousands of Jamaicans, many of whom owned record labels and stores and promoted shows.

Andy, 71, released his latest album, Midnight Rocker, in March. He had a major UK hit in 1978 with Natty Dread A weh She Want which he did with DJ Tappa Zukie. It was one of the songs he performed at the Royal Festival Hall.

McGregor, 65, had a strong run on the UK charts. Especially with songs like Big Ship, Push Come to Shove and Just Don’t Want to be Lonely.

German-born Rodigan’s illustrious career began with the British Broadcasting Corporation in 1978. He rose to international prominence in the 1980s as a disc jockey at Capital Radio in London. Plus, through a series of PA clashes with his Jamaican counterpart, Barrington “Barry G” Gordon.

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Where’s the reggae music? – Observer from Jamaica https://reggae-shack.com/wheres-the-reggae-music-observer-from-jamaica/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 14:08:58 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/wheres-the-reggae-music-observer-from-jamaica/ David Rodigan in action Let’s talk Reggae Jamaican music has come a long way since Prince Buster, Millie Small, The Skatalites and Desmond Dekker first entered the British Hit Parade in the early 1960s. Looking in the rear view mirror is cool, but if we spend too much time watching, we’ll crash the bus. So […]]]>

David Rodigan in action

Let’s talk Reggae

Jamaican music has come a long way since Prince Buster, Millie Small, The Skatalites and Desmond Dekker first entered the British Hit Parade in the early 1960s. Looking in the rear view mirror is cool, but if we spend too much time watching, we’ll crash the bus. So if the journey is to continue, we need to look ahead, to the road ahead, and much of that responsibility lies with the up-and-coming artists of today who are in the driver’s seat.

With the advent of ‘rub-a-dub’ and then ‘dancehall’ music in the 80s and 90s, we saw significant changes in what the rest of the world called reggae – there was a change in paradigm. The culture was changing and it was a new expression of how young people felt. It wasn’t a reggae beat anymore, it had a new rhythmic energy and a new tempo.

Throughout the 60s, 70s and 80s, reggae attracted a global audience who heard a grounded, grounded feel-good sound that had also emerged in various elements of pop music culture, protest songs and rock music. They also traveled by the thousands to see the Jamaican artists who made this great music; as Bob Marley put it, it was ‘Roots Rock Reggae’ and audiences in every major city, from America to the UK and across central Europe, caught the fever.

What happened to this passion for reggae music that shone so bright around the world?

Ask any concert promoter and they’ll tell you that’s just not what it used to be, mainly because a lot of the music that’s being made in Jamaica now isn’t really reggae , certainly not rhythmically, and the headliners that might stand alone – Large, sold-out concert halls hardly exist anymore, with a few notable exceptions.

If you go to a dance party in Jamaica these days you’ll be lucky to hear reggae playing at all except for a few songs at the start of the warm-up, so it’s strictly dancehall and its latest offspring, dancehall trap. Much of what is now enjoyed by young people in Jamaica is not what the rest of the world recognizes as reggae. It may be hugely popular with young people in Jamaica, but does it export beyond Norman Manley Airport? Does Jamaica have a cultural deficit in terms of the reggae music they used to do versus what they do now? By that I mean in terms of singers and bands. Sure, there’s no shortage of toasters, singers, and rappers, but their appeal lies in an already established fan base.

What has made reggae such an incredible musical export is its universal mass appeal.

It was loved because of its central messages of hope, freedom, and righteous indignation against a Babylonian system that holds people back and exploits the poorer classes. The messages were in the songs and the world was listening. Roots-rock reggae offered empowerment, it was a beacon of hope that people could relate to, and it wasn’t just the songs of social injustice that struck a chord, it was also love songs. The sweet, aching vocals and soulful harmonies of these incredible voices, and let’s not forget the quality of these songs – the song makes the singer, the singer doesn’t make the song is an adage that still holds true. Then there was the power of reggae rhythm itself – heavy bass lines, the one drop, the rolling cadence of those organ and guitar riffs and the mind-blowing joy of dub music – created by engineers such as King Tubby, Sylvan Morris and Errol Thompson.

The other problem facing reggae today is the insatiable thirst the world now has for social content – that endless carousel of photos and video clips on Instagram, Facebookand ICT Tac. It’s more and more about being seen, rather than what you actually say. The more ridiculous the look, the more attention it seems to get, and we just have to see what went down on social media following Fantan Mojah’s video for king of fire to see how visual content can spark media interest.

We are definitely seeing more sexually explicit videos, especially in terms of the portrayal of women, as well as more glorification of gang violence and culture, and the gruesome use of guns. This begs the question: What happened to reggae and its message of peace and love? That’s not to say that some Jamaican artists aren’t making uplifting music videos anymore because they do, but the proliferation of these other videos brings a sense of hopelessness.

It is right and fitting that we reflect on the work of Jamaican superstars who have made reggae music famous around the world. Why don’t we see new young stars emerging that can chart a similar path to those revered stars that shone brightly across the world in those fine days?

What about the radio, why do I barely hear reggae music on the many radio stations that now exist in Jamaica, why does the radio seem to belong to the dancehall-trap genre ? Surely we have to ask the question, why did Afrobeats, which is basically rooted in Jamaican dancehall music, become so phenomenally popular and why did it leave Jamaican music in its wake in terms of global popularity?

I suggest that part of the problem is that almost nothing we hear today is actually salvageable. By that I mean it is physically recoverable, like the discs were. They were tangible and collecting them was addictive because if you liked a song you had to buy the record because it was the only way to hear it over and over. Remember that reggae received no mainstream daytime radio, so it depended on loyal fans to support it by buying singles and albums on vinyl. Now you can stream reggae anywhere, but you don’t own it anymore.

The advent in 2013 of what has been somewhat controversially called the ‘reggae revival movement’ saw a return to music heralded by a wave of young musicians, artists and bands, from Chronixx and Raging Fyah to Protoje and Jesse Royal and as we approach International Women’s Day on March 8 let’s not forget all the work that has already been done by the pioneering women of reggae, namely Phyllis Dillon, the I- Three—Marcia Griffiths, Judy Mowatt, and Rita Marley; Janet Kay & Carol Thompson, Lady Saw, Tanya Stephens and more recently Jah9, Etana and Spice and the new wave of women such as Jada Kingdom, Kelissa, Koffee, Lila Ike and Sevana.

It should be noted that for millions of people outside of Jamaica reggae music is still seen to be rooted in the works of Bob Marley, he still sells more music than any living reggae artist and many can be learned from what he said and how he said it. Hopefully the cultural messages of reggae, especially as manifested through Rastafari, which has played such a central role in the development of the music, will continue to inspire people. The future belongs to the young (and the young at heart). May the seeds sown so many years ago by legendary music icons continue to grow and flourish. For it is a rich heritage that we have inherited and all who love it have a duty to nurture it and nurture it with new music that brings hope and comfort to this troubled world.

David Rodigan is a British radio personality who also performs as a disc jockey. Known for his selections of reggae and dancehall music, he has performed on stations including Radio London, Capital 95.8, Kiss 100, BBC Radio 1Xtra, BBC Radio 2 and BFBS Radio.

He has stated that his passion for Jamaican music was initiated by watching Millie Small perform her 1964 hit My Boy Lollipop at the Ready Steady Go! TV show as a schoolboy. By age 15, Rodigan was DJing at school dances and youth clubs. Leaving school in 1970, he spent a year studying economics before leaving to study drama. Despite an acting career, Rodigan maintained his passion for music, selling records in Oxford and then Putney, before getting a job at Radio London in 1978 on the show Reggae Rockers. A year later, he was offered a permanent slot at Capital Radio to present Roots Rockers, which ran for 11 years. In 1990, a change in the station’s direction and music policy resulted in Rodigan leaving to start a new show for Kiss FM when it relaunched in September as the first legal 24-hour dance music station in London. He hosted the Sunday night slot from 11 p.m. to midnight until November 2012, when the slot was moved to midnight and he quit in protest at what he called the “continued marginalization” of the reggae genre. .

Rodigan is renowned for his musical clashes with established sound systems and the likes of Killamanjaro, Stone Love, Barry G and Bass Odyssey.

Rodigan is a recipient of the Order of Distinction at Officer Rank and has been recognized by the Jamaica Reggae Industry Association for his contributions to the growth and development of reggae music. He was made a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in 2012 for his services to broadcasting.

David Rodigan

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Turbulence calls on the government to protect reggae music https://reggae-shack.com/turbulence-calls-on-the-government-to-protect-reggae-music/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 17:21:26 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/turbulence-calls-on-the-government-to-protect-reggae-music/ Reggae artist Turbulence calls on the government and people of Jamaica to do more to protect reggae music. “I hear a lot of people making noise because SOJA won the Reggae Grammy. I have no problem with an American band winning the Grammy for best reggae album, because any artist or band that makes music […]]]>

Reggae artist Turbulence calls on the government and people of Jamaica to do more to protect reggae music.

“I hear a lot of people making noise because SOJA won the Reggae Grammy. I have no problem with an American band winning the Grammy for best reggae album, because any artist or band that makes music good reggae music can win the prize.

He continued, “I don’t think Jamaicans or the government understand how powerful reggae music is because if they did, they wouldn’t take it for granted. I’ve seen the power of Reggae music and the impact it has on people’s lives everywhere I’ve toured. Reggae music should be part of the school curriculum from kindergarten through high school.

“People all over the world know that Reggae music originated in Jamaica, but if we don’t protect and preserve it, we will lose it just like Ska. I don’t know of any popular Ska bands in Jamaica, but I have seen bands playing Ska in other parts of the world. The same will happen to Reggae if we don’t roll up our socks, he said.

Turbulence recently released a brand new EP titled To be strong. The five-song EP produced by Leon Smillie for Total Satisfaction Records was released on all digital platforms on April 2.

“My new EP is out and it’s doing well, I’m getting great feedback on it. I’m not at all surprised because it’s a great Roots Reggae project. All songs were recorded to live Reggae beats. He has that authentic Reggae sound that people love and appreciate,” said Turbulence.

The first single from the EP which is the title track, To be strong, is currently enjoying strong rotation both locally and overseas. The video for the song is doing well too.

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The reggae music train could leave Jamaica at the station https://reggae-shack.com/the-reggae-music-train-could-leave-jamaica-at-the-station/ Mon, 04 Apr 2022 20:02:04 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/the-reggae-music-train-could-leave-jamaica-at-the-station/ In 1985, the US-based National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences introduced the Reggae category at its annual Gramophone Awards ceremony. The award was to be given to this artist or artists for quality works in the reggae musical genre to “honor artistic achievement, technical skill, and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard […]]]>

In 1985, the US-based National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences introduced the Reggae category at its annual Gramophone Awards ceremony. The award was to be given to this artist or artists for quality works in the reggae musical genre to “honor artistic achievement, technical skill, and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position”. In this regard, the Grammy Award for Best Reggae Recording was given to artists for eligible songs or albums. Clean Jamaica Black Uhuru won that inaugural Grammy in 1985.

JAMAICAN GRAMMY SUCCESS
Black Uhuru’s victory was a major achievement for Jamaican music, as their selection acted as an acknowledgment by the American music industry and its associates that Jamaican reggae music belonged. It was a fitting post-epithet to the groundwork done by the likes of Prince Buster, Millie Small, Desmond Decker, and especially, Bob Marley and the Wailers, all of whom have spent most of their adult lives taking Jamaican music around the world. The Grammy Award also highlighted the creative value of the islands’ capital, Kingston, and the importance of its role in creating world music, even if that same music was treated lightly and disdainfully by the owners of the capital and the creators of the island’s economic development policies.

Since Black Uhuru’s victory, several other artists have enjoyed similar success over the next 36 years. These include multiple winners, Ziggy Marley, Damian Junior Gong Marley, Stephen Marley, Bunny Wailer, Toots Hibbert, Jimmy Cliff, The Burning Spear, Steel Pulse, Shabba Ranks, Peter Tosh, Buju Banton, Shaggy, Sly and Robbie, Lee Scratch Perry, Morgan Heritage, Inner Circle and the only Koffee winner.

It is important that we keep in mind that these awards focus on genres, not country of origin. Additionally, their results are largely determined by “peer review” and not based on record sales. Nevertheless, a Grammy nomination (if the artists’ connections are properly wired) could bring positive elements to the artists’ careers. A Grammy win would be even more meaningful as it raises the profile of artists (again, assuming the success is carefully managed.)

THE GLOBAL INFLUENCE OF JAMAICAN MUSIC
Nonetheless, the 37-year-old’s successes have not been without issue or rancor, and the Grammys have been criticized for the continued dominance of the Marley name, among other issues. Throughout this time, too, Jamaicans at home and abroad have maintained that the quality of the music produced by our artists was below the standards to which they were accustomed. Jamaican music has for years influenced musicians around the world. After all, DJ music in the early 1980s spawned rap music in the United States, reggae spawned reggaeton in the Latin hallway, and dancehall spawned Afro beats. The common thread here is that in any case, it is Jamaican music that has traveled to different shores to influence sharp-eared artists and enterprising players in the music industry in those jurisdictions to incorporate Reggae/Dancehall into their own offerings, creating newer and more intriguing output while expanding the music’s audience base. Pulse of Steel is a Grammy-winning British band, and no other non-Jamaican band has done for Reggae what U-B40made an all-white British band.

THE VALUE OF REGGAE TO THE JAMAICAN ECONOMY
From Jamaica’s point of view, Reggae music has served for decades to attract millions of visitors to the island and I am curious that if this music continues its pace of development on distant shores, will there be enough incentive for potential visitors to travel to Jamaica or to travel to other places where Reggae dominance is exploited? This is the takeaway I have from SOYwins the 2022 Reggae Grammy. We may have created the sound, but have we really done enough to deserve the genre’s maintenance as Jamaican? SOJA has done many recording sessions in Jamaica, giving authenticity to its own production. Their win serves to further broaden Reggae’s audience, so it’s up to our own musicians, artists, and industry interests to take advantage of this exposure instead of bawling about cultural appropriation.

NEED FOR YAWNING INVESTMENT
In my view, these cultural appropriation arguments are meaningless because Jamaica has made little more than a verbal investment in the development of the industry. Despite the declared importance of music as an integral part of the cultural offer of the island, there are no arenas dedicated to the broadcasting of live music. There are no reggae music museums or theme parks for visitors and locals to connect with the giants of music’s past or to give an ear to the talent of the child. Add to that, the majority of our current generation of enthusiasts are unaware of music history. It is music that was born from the bowels of Kingston’s ghettos in the 1950s but is still treated with the disdain high society had for its creators and their production. The Jamaican music industry is sorely lacking in professional and experienced personnel, both in management and in performance. In the 1960s, there were only a handful of producers operating in a space where there was a plethora of performers. Sixty years later, there are more record producers than there are artists capable of producing quality output as the industry has satisfied the long-standing goal of “carrying” more personnel, but at the expense of quality.

JAMAICA IS LEFT BEHIND
Artists and management resent being completely plugged into the industry, especially in the areas of publishing, copyright, intellectual property, marketing and management. How many artists are registered to vote at the Grammys? Is the Jamaican market, including its diaspora, big enough to support the genre? Are we alone, doing enough to attract more non-Jamaicans to buy our music? Until these areas are addressed, the Jamaican influence in its own creation will shift to other shores as we continue to complain about cultural appropriation.
Last week we heard the news that Billboard had dropped Reggae and Dancehall. This week it’s Virginia based SOJA wins the Reggae Grammy. If that’s not a clear sign that the train is leaving the station, then I wonder what is.

About the Author

Richard Hugh BlackfordRichard Hugh Blackford hosts a 2-hour music-focused Internet show Sunday Scoops on yaawdmedia.com every Sunday from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The show focuses on the Jamaican Music Foundation and takes its audience on a nostalgic yet historic musical journey, looking back at years of Jamaican musical development as the hosts explore the careers of Jamaican artists. Sunday Scoops features interviews with personalities, discussions on Jamaican music and other hot topics. The show is co-hosted by famed DJ Garth Hendricks.

Photo by Caught In Joy on Unsplash

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Reggae music festival injects $22 million into St. Pete’s economy • St Pete Catalyst https://reggae-shack.com/reggae-music-festival-injects-22-million-into-st-petes-economy-st-pete-catalyst/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/reggae-music-festival-injects-22-million-into-st-petes-economy-st-pete-catalyst/ According to a report by an independent research firm, the Reggae Rise Up music festival injected $22 million into the St. Pete economy last October. The Downtown St. Petersburg Partnership, in conjunction with festival organizers, engaged Tampa-based Meshsem, Inc. to survey attendees at the three-day Vinoy Park festival. The 2021 Reggae Rise-Up drew 15,000 people […]]]>

According to a report by an independent research firm, the Reggae Rise Up music festival injected $22 million into the St. Pete economy last October.

The Downtown St. Petersburg Partnership, in conjunction with festival organizers, engaged Tampa-based Meshsem, Inc. to survey attendees at the three-day Vinoy Park festival. The 2021 Reggae Rise-Up drew 15,000 people daily, with the majority of them staying in local hotels, motels and B&Bs.

That’s all good news, as the seventh Reggae Rise Up begins Friday at the fenced bayside venue. It is about to sell out, although some ticket levels remain (click here).

(It’s not the “seventh edition,” as Covid has forced the event to be postponed and rescheduled multiple times.)

The multi-band festival, said Jason Mathis, CEO of the Downtown Partnership, “is such a great fit for downtown St. Pete – the vibe, the energy, it’s totally consistent with what is St. Pete.

“It makes sense in terms of improving our culture. Strengthen our sense of belonging and our values. And also to improve our economy. And the economy is the thing that we haven’t always articulated or been very clear about in the past.

Meshsem reported that 2,021 participants came from every US state, as well as Canada, Germany, Russia, Japan, Croatia, Switzerland, Antigua, Angola, France, Aruba, Albania, Peru, the Netherlands, Paraguay, Italy, the Bahamas and the United Kingdom.

Throughout each year, Utah-based Reggae Rise Up travels between four different US cities. Festival co-founder Bryan Borreson said the St. Petersburg event was always the busiest.

“There’s a certain kind of magic that happens here,” he explained. “Which is the water, mixed with the grass and the sand…and the backdrop of the city. And the whole community is behind us when we show up. And we’re here quite a bit, so it’s a second home, so to speak.

The breakdown of expenses in the Meshsem report:

Direct impact: $18,923,310.56 in direct economic output. Takes into account the money injected directly into the economy by participants’ spending on tickets, hotels, restaurants and purchases from suppliers. In addition, this includes the expenses of local event staff to organize the event.

Indirect impact: $2,425,149.44 in indirect economic output. Includes revenue resulting from event expenses – eg vendors purchase items/raw materials from other local businesses so they can sell finished goods at the event.

Induced impact: $628,053.04 in induced economic output. Local expenditures (at the household level) made possible by salaries earned or expenditures by participants during the event.

“Sometimes, says Mathis, you do an event and it’s just money circulating in the local community. The compelling thing about this event is that so many people came from outside of St. Pete. So these expenses are new money coming into our community.

Terry Marks, Executive Director of the St. Petersburg Arts Alliance, added, “It’s not just the economic impact, it’s also the spirit of reggae. And the humanity of reggae, the energy and the inspiration of reggae. And all that music is. So it’s really a gift for our city.

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SEAN AUSTIN – New Prince of Lover’s Rock Reggae Music https://reggae-shack.com/sean-austin-new-prince-of-lovers-rock-reggae-music/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 08:56:02 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/sean-austin-new-prince-of-lovers-rock-reggae-music/ (YourDigitalWall Editorial): – Kingston, Jamaica March 15, 2022 (Issuewire.com) – Emerging at the forefront of reggae music with an arsenal of great songs, the versatility that Sean Austin aka XO brings to the industry is one that many upcoming artists, and those who are already ahead in the industry, will face. His new album, Purple […]]]>

(YourDigitalWall Editorial): – Kingston, Jamaica March 15, 2022 (Issuewire.com) – Emerging at the forefront of reggae music with an arsenal of great songs, the versatility that Sean Austin aka XO brings to the industry is one that many upcoming artists, and those who are already ahead in the industry, will face.

His new album, Purple Hearts, is a mix of dancehall, reggae rock and hip hop lovers, where Sean collaborates with artists such as Anastasia Hera Smith and Lion Heights, and TroytonMusic’s Troyton Hinds producers, Chris Knight and Tim more from TrakMajors. . This album is sure to bring back that electricity to love rock and will be a sure hit with its young audience. Confessions and The Same Girl are two songs on the album that should position Sean Austin well in the industry.

With a clear and distinctive voice, Sean Austin of Clarendon, Jamaica is known in the entertainment world as a tough, consistent songwriter/singer who challenges himself daily to perform at his best. The artist has started to get noticed internationally, with bookings for Europe and Africa on hold until Covid-19 restrictions ease and he is allowed to travel to these continents to occur.

Driven by an ambition to rise to the top of the music industry, Sean is focused on delivering the highest quality reggae music. “I want to deliver useful music, in the sense of bringing reggae back to its true nature and its form of storytelling (which) evokes human expression and emotion,” he said. “My goal is to create a body of work that reflects the lives of ordinary people, especially Jamaicans.”

The artist has been compared to international stars such as Romain Virgo, Beres Hammond and Christopher Martin and has been touted as one of the most likely to break out in 2021. Sean Austin is the owner of the recording studio and the TRUE publishing company. His songs are published and distributed under the label ‘TRUE Music’ and his arsenal of songs can be found on http://seanaustinmusic.com and other well-known music social spaces such as Youtube, Spotify etc under his nickname #iamseanaustin @iamseanautin.
The artist can be contacted for reservations through Christian Linton at The Red Umbrella Entertainment Inc 1 (512) 897 3551 or [email protected]

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The famous Jamaican youtuber (Trabass) is making a comeback in dancehall reggae music https://reggae-shack.com/the-famous-jamaican-youtuber-trabass-is-making-a-comeback-in-dancehall-reggae-music/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 15:31:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/the-famous-jamaican-youtuber-trabass-is-making-a-comeback-in-dancehall-reggae-music/ Since signing with MVB RECORDS in 2021, the Jamaican Youtube star known as Trabass has topped the Dancehall Reggae music charts. Trabass works with an independent label in New York, named MVB RECORDS. For an independent music artist on an independent record label to outperform major artists on the Apple Music charts” – Rachel S. […]]]>

Since signing with MVB RECORDS in 2021, the Jamaican Youtube star known as Trabass has topped the Dancehall Reggae music charts.

Trabass works with an independent label in New York, named MVB RECORDS. For an independent music artist on an independent record label to outperform major artists on the Apple Music charts”

– Rachel S.

ORLANDO, FLORIDA, USA, Feb. 20, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — There is a Jamaican YouTuber who has over 160,000,000 views on YouTube and millions of subscribers on his many social media pages. His name is Trabass and his music is currently on Apple Music’s New Reggae albums list. Andrew “Trabass” Chambers is well known throughout the Caribbean diaspora as a comedic sensation. His new EP “Trabalocity” was released on February 15, and it landed the coveted No. 1 spot for “New Modern Dancehall Album” and “New Reggae Album” on Apple Music. His previous EP (“1989”) was released a months prior and debuted at No. 1 on Apple Music’s New Modern Dancehall album chart.

It reached No. 1 on Apple Music’s New Reggae Albums chart by surpassing several well-known ones; and established reggae artists including Vybz Kartel, Dexta Dapps and Skillibeng. What makes it such a feat is that Trabass works with an independent label in New York, named MVB RECORDS. For an independent music artist on an independent label, topping major artists on the Apple Music charts is a big achievement.

It must be said that “Trabalocity” by Trabass is a real treat. The 6-song EP features fewer guest appearances than her previous EP (“1989”), and her lead single “Used To Say”, featuring Noah Powa, may be her best single of 2022. The only other featured artists are FamousSosick and Dancehall Reggae Composer Bvrban. Listeners can enjoy “Trabalocity” on all major music streaming platforms; Apple Music, Spotify, TIDAL, etc.

Rachel Simone
UPC MAGAZINE, LLC.
+1 615-630-4203
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Trabass – “Used to Say” (Ft. Noah Powa)

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Reggae songs that can speak for you on Valentine’s Day https://reggae-shack.com/reggae-songs-that-can-speak-for-you-on-valentines-day/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 15:24:15 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/reggae-songs-that-can-speak-for-you-on-valentines-day/ When you need to express your feelings but can’t find the “right” words, music is that friend who could speak for you. As we celebrate Valentine’s Day, allow music to help you navigate and communicate your emotions to your loved one, whether you’re declaring your undying love, recommitting, or trying to ignite that flame. D’Music […]]]>

When you need to express your feelings but can’t find the “right” words, music is that friend who could speak for you.

As we celebrate Valentine’s Day, allow music to help you navigate and communicate your emotions to your loved one, whether you’re declaring your undying love, recommitting, or trying to ignite that flame.

D’Music curated a playlist of Reggae Love Songs – after all, we’re also celebrating Reggae Month – with lyrics that will help you do just that.

Check out these lines from Reggae Love Songs:

1. “When we’re together. My heart feels so much better. Girl, I need you and that’s no lie.

Words of affirmation are one of the primary love languages, and with words like these from Pressure in her single “Love and Affection,” your partner won’t have to wonder where they stand.

2. Reggae crooner Beres Hammond reminds us to live in the moment and celebrate the love you now have with your partner with his hit single “She Loves Me Now”: “She loves me now. And that just means I can’t complain. She loves me now. And I have to admit, I feel the same.

If you’ve waited a while to make your relationship a reality, these words can be even more meaningful.

3. “When I find that girl. I’ll lock her up. I swear that girl will be the only one for me.

If you haven’t found “that” girl this Valentine’s Day, then you might have better luck next year after serenading with the lyrics to Jah Cure’s 2015 hit, “That Girl.”

4. Telling your partner how you want to be loved is a great way to strengthen your relationship. But if you have a little trouble expressing that, trust Buju Banton.

His song “Wanna be Loved” should give some insight: “I want to be loved, not for who you think I am or what you want me to be. Could you love me for me?”

5. Win your partner back using these lyrics from Singing Melody’s “Want You Back”: “Whatever I said, whatever I did, I didn’t mean it. I just want you back for good. Whenever I’m wrong, just tell me the song and I’ll sing it. You will be right and understood.

6. Give your partner a hint of your Valentine’s Day plans by covering Sanchez’s classic “Sometimes” in which he exclaims, “All I really want is to hold you, treat you right, be with you day and night”.

It can’t be simpler than that.

7. Tell your partner how you see her with some lyrics from “She’s Royal” by Tarrus Riley. Let her know how you will continue to treat her like a man is supposed to. You’ll never have to cry, no.

8. “Baby you’re all I want when you’re lying here in my arms. I can’t believe we’re in heaven.

Nothing compares to the feeling of being with the person you love on the day meant to celebrate love. Da’ville compares this feeling to heaven in his song “In Heaven,” and we agree.

9. “I’m connected to you girl, I can feel your power because it just connects to me. Amma, be your galaxy, you’re gonna be my world. Don’t move unless you say okay.”

Jah Cure captures the emotions of love and commitment in his song “Nothing”; reconnect with your significant other this valentine’s day with the lyrics to this song.

ten. “Your love is my love. And my love is your love. It would take forever to break us. It would take all the stars just to hold us.

Celebrate and recommit to each other this Valentine’s Day with this remix of Whitney Houston’s “Your Love Is My Love” by reggae singer Terry Linen.

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Jamaican artist (Trabass) changes the sound of dancehall reggae music https://reggae-shack.com/jamaican-artist-trabass-changes-the-sound-of-dancehall-reggae-music/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 07:56:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/jamaican-artist-trabass-changes-the-sound-of-dancehall-reggae-music/ Trabass – Cover of Trabalocity Trabass – 1989 EP Brand MVB RECORDS On January 17, Trabass’ “1989” debuted at No. 1 on Apple Music’s New Dancehall Reggae chart. Now he’s releasing another EP “Trabalocity” on February 15th. a month after his EP “1989” debuted at No. 1. The first single from his new EP is […]]]>

Trabass – Cover of Trabalocity

Trabass – 1989 EP

Brand MVB RECORDS

On January 17, Trabass’ “1989” debuted at No. 1 on Apple Music’s New Dancehall Reggae chart. Now he’s releasing another EP “Trabalocity” on February 15th.

a month after his EP “1989” debuted at No. 1. The first single from his new EP is titled “Used To Say”, and it features the stunning vocals of one of Dancehall Reggae’s rising stars , Noah Powa.

– Michelle R.

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES, Feb. 11, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The Caribbean diaspora knows him for his short films, comedy sketches, as well as his 2016 Billboard chart-topping album, “Trabulation.” His name is Trabass and he is currently one of Jamaica’s most popular artists, with over 100,000,000 views on YouTube and millions of subscribers on social media.

Recently, Trabass made an impressive resurgence on the music charts in mid-January 2022, when he released his EP “1989” through New York independent label MVB Records. “1989” debuted at No. 1 on Apple Music’s New Dancehall/Reggae Albums chart, and it currently continues to rise and fall in the chart as of press time.

Trabass seems to be working feverishly on creating new music, as he is now gearing up to release another EP (Trabalocity) on February 15, just a month after his EP “1989” debuted at #1. The first single from his new EP is titled “Used To Say”, and it features the stunning vocals of one of Dancehall Reggae’s rising stars, Noah Powa.

Trabass fans and new listeners can check out debut single “Used To Say” on Apple Music, ahead of the new EP’s release on February 15. “Trabalocity” is a 6-song EP that continues an obvious trend with new music from Trabass, and that trend is pushing the Dancehall Reggae music genre in a whole new direction.

Rumor has it that Trabass also plans to release their first full album, in June 2022.

michelle robinson
jamaican herald
+1 (876) 901-5022
write to us here

Trabass – Trabalocity: “Used to say”

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