Reggae music – Reggae Shack http://reggae-shack.com/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 10:24:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://reggae-shack.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile-120x120.png Reggae music – Reggae Shack http://reggae-shack.com/ 32 32 Obituary: Astro, charismatic star of the UB40 who aimed to popularize reggae music https://reggae-shack.com/obituary-astro-charismatic-star-of-the-ub40-who-aimed-to-popularize-reggae-music/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 13:56:30 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/obituary-astro-charismatic-star-of-the-ub40-who-aimed-to-popularize-reggae-music/ Death: November 6, 2021. TERENCE Wilson, better known as Astro, who died at the age of 64 from a short illness, was a founding member of UB40, the multiracial group that has been at the forefront of the integration of British reggae music into the global public. As a toaster (which meant speaking or singing […]]]>

Death: November 6, 2021.

TERENCE Wilson, better known as Astro, who died at the age of 64 from a short illness, was a founding member of UB40, the multiracial group that has been at the forefront of the integration of British reggae music into the global public. As a toaster (which meant speaking or singing to a beat or beat) and MC, he was central to the band’s attitude as much as his sound on hits such as Red Red Wine (1983) and I Got You Babe (1985).

On record, he gave UB40 his political conscience, while he rhymed on the daily racism experienced by his generation. In the live arena, he established himself even further, his charismatic stage presence and chatty personality courting a huge audience as he encouraged them to party.

UB40 was formed in 1978, named after the then unemployment benefit card, which the original eight members of the group – and several million more for that matter – had experienced firsthand. Led by Ali Campbell, with his brother Robin on guitar, the group came at a time of high racial tensions in the UK, with Margaret Thatcher’s rise as Tory Prime Minister accentuating class divisions.

Wilson became Campbell’s perfect foil, as UB40 wrote about the Martin Luther King assassination in April 1968 and the controversial “sus” law. The latter is taken from the Vagrancy Act of 1824, which, until its repeal in 1981, legitimized the stop and search of black youths by the police on the grounds that they were perceived to be acting in a suspicious manner.

In an interview with Graeme Thomson in the Guardian earlier this year, Wilson explained how he “went through the same ordeal as most blacks in the late 1970s” and how being pulled up by the police was “a weekly occurrence” . We found it more difficult to write love songs than activist lyrics because it was much easier to write about things that you had witnessed or read. It seemed natural to us.

As reported in 2006 in the Campbell brothers’ joint autobiography Blood and Fire, despite the success of UB40, Wilson was denied entry to nightclubs because of his dreadlocks, while the white members of the group were allowed to enter.

In 1990, he was jailed and deported from Seychelles after police allegedly found marijuana in his hotel room. He was then refused entry to Hawaii, where the band had to perform without him. Despite such abuse, Wilson remained an artist every inch of the stage and was at the heart and soul of the band.

Terence Wilson was born in Birmingham, the son of Jamaican immigrants who settled in England as part of the Windrush Generation. He grew up in the multiracial neighborhood of Balsall Heath and went to school with future UB40 keyboardist Mickey Virtue, who has remained his oldest friend in the group. He acquired his brand nickname “Astronaut” from the Doc Marten boots he wore.

Wilson began DJing and drinking with Duke Alloy’s Birmingham-based sound system, and bonded with UB40 founders Ali and Robin over their mutual love of reggae. After signing with local label Graduate, the band scored a top ten with their debut single, Food for Thought / King, with both songs appearing on their politically charged debut album, Signing Off (1980).

With writing credits shared equally between the group, another success came with One in Ten, from their second album, Present Arms (1981). The title of the song referred to the percentage of people in the West Midlands claiming unemployment benefits in 1981.

Despite these serious concerns, Wilson was cited as acknowledging that reggae is as much about pop music as it is about social consciousness. This was evidenced when UB40 achieved worldwide success with a cover of Red Red Wine written by Neil Diamond, from their 1983 album, Labor of Love. Another cover, of Sonny and Cher’s 1965 hit song I Got You Babe, by Bagariddim (1985), featured Pretenders singer Chrissie Hynde. Both singles went to number one in the UK charts.

UB40 sold over 70 million records, before a bitter split saw the Campbell brothers directing two different versions of the group. After appearing on 18 UB40 albums, Wilson himself left the original band in 2013 in response to plans for a UB40 country music album. He joined Ali Campbell and Virtue in what eventually became UB40 with Ali, Astro and Mickey, and appeared alongside them in 2014 on their new record, Silhouette. An unplugged album followed two years later, with A Real Labor of Love released in 2018.

After Virtue left, the group became UB40 with Ali Campbell and Astro, and continued to tour the world. In June 2021, they performed an online concert of Signing Off in its entirety. Throughout the changes, Wilson’s love for the roots music around which UB40 was formed never waned. “I’ve been on a mission for over thirty years trying to help popularize reggae music,” Wilson told www.reggaeville.com in 2014 after reuniting with Campbell and Virtue.

“And all these years later, we’re still on the same mission. Because we do not personally believe that reggae is sufficiently broadcast on mainstream radio. There are many specialized stations, but they only preach to converts. What we need to reach are people who have never listened to reggae before but who might be interested. They just need someone to show them the way.

He is survived by his wife, Dawn Wilson.


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Caribbean Entertainment Report – Best New Reggae Music You Need To Know And More https://reggae-shack.com/caribbean-entertainment-report-best-new-reggae-music-you-need-to-know-and-more/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 02:46:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/caribbean-entertainment-report-best-new-reggae-music-you-need-to-know-and-more/ Jamaican singer Lila Ike says she is gay. (Photo credit: JOSE JORDAN / AFP via Getty Images) By publisher NAN ET News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri, November 18 2021: Several reggae artists have recently released new music and videos, including Taurus Riley and Skip Marley. Riley’s Single “Love Salute” Releases Tomorrow, November 19the. A […]]]>
Jamaican singer Lila Ike says she is gay. (Photo credit: JOSE JORDAN / AFP via Getty Images)

By publisher NAN ET

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri, November 18 2021: Several reggae artists have recently released new music and videos, including Taurus Riley and Skip Marley.

Riley’s Single “Love Salute” Releases Tomorrow, November 19the. A contemporary take on Roots Reggae, with an infectious yet familiar baseline. Appealing to younger audiences and traditional reggae fans, “Love Salute” is a heartwarming track with powerful meaning.

True to the authentic expression of heavy bass and brass associated with the roots of reggae expression, Kareem Burrell unearthed a classic production from his father Fatis’ catalog titled “Hold On”.

Marley, top of the charts, nominated twice at the Grammy ©, whose last track “Atmosphere,” starring Jamaican MC Popcaan spent the summer and fall activating the highest vibrations of every listener, the song’s first official video showed Thursday..

The track was produced by Rykeyz, who also produced Skip’s # 1 worldwide hit, certified RIAA Gold. “To slow down” with the double Grammy-winning artist © HER

“Vibe is a feeling,” Skip says of the song’s fun and heartwarming dance riddim. “A whole mind and an energy. A movement that brings light and life. It’s about being alive! The video brings “Vibe” to life and dimension by celebrating life on the bike. ”

Reggae star Alborosie also recently released a new song, which released the two-track digital single “Ginal Dub with Collie Buddz”. The single is accompanied by a gangster-themed music video shot on location at the Crowne Gardens Retreat, Jamaica and Aradeo, Italy, at the famous Skatafashow restaurant. The clip features performances by Italian actors Sandro Pizzuto, Giampiero Colì, Andrea Buttazzo, Oronzo Paladini, Simone Guido, Arianna Miccoli and Stefani Bruno, and Alborosie playing a Jamaica-based crime boss – all to describe the meaning of the phrase. “ginal. ‘

MOBO

The UK MOBO Awards are scheduled for December 5the and Queen of Dancehall, Spice, won a MOBO nomination for Best Reggae Act 2021. Also nominated in the category: Sean Paul, Lila Iké, Shenseea, Skillibeng and Popcaan.

TEAR

Terence Wilson, a key part of reggae group UB40, has passed away at the age of 64. He had added rap vocals to hits like “Red Red Wine”. Wilson died on November 6e. No cause of death has been given and publications have not indicated where he died.

Go out

Conscious Jamaican-born reggae singer Lila Iké has turned gay.

She said someone was trying to blackmail her, so she said it first, “What if I like women? “

The Reggae singer made the disclosure on her Twitter account as she claims she shares the information before anyone can use it against her and someone tries to kill her.

“What if I like women?” My music is not real? She asked in a tweet on Sunday night.

She also said she was raped and assaulted before concluding in a tweet that she was gay.


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Ginjah wants to bring soul back to reggae | Entertainment https://reggae-shack.com/ginjah-wants-to-bring-soul-back-to-reggae-entertainment/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 10:02:42 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/ginjah-wants-to-bring-soul-back-to-reggae-entertainment/ Recording artist Ginjah is determined to restore reggae music to its rightful place on the international music scene. “Reggae music is one of the most influential musical genres in the world. It has always been an inspiration to people in various parts of the world. Back then, people looked to reggae artists for guidance and […]]]>

Recording artist Ginjah is determined to restore reggae music to its rightful place on the international music scene.

“Reggae music is one of the most influential musical genres in the world. It has always been an inspiration to people in various parts of the world. Back then, people looked to reggae artists for guidance and upliftment. Things are so different now because the music has been watered down, but I’m here to restore its integrity, “Ginjah said.

The tireless singer, known for hits such as Never lost my way and Sweet killer , is currently promoting a new single, titled Soulman.

“I am the ‘reggae soulman’. I put the soul back into reggae music. My songs convey messages of love, healing and inspiration. I make music to heal people and awaken their consciousness.” , did he declare.

Soulman was produced by Conroy Smith to the beat of Good Woman.

“This song receives a lot of support from DJs around the world. I’m grateful for all the love it receives. I’m grateful for their support,” he said. Ginjah’s album, titled Soulman Reggae , is also in the running for a Grammy nomination.

“My album is being considered for a nomination in the reggae category of the 64th Grammy Awards. Although this is a very competitive process, I think my album has a good chance of being nominated,” he said. declared.


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Alkaline “Maniac” tops iTunes Reggae music video ranking https://reggae-shack.com/alkaline-maniac-tops-itunes-reggae-music-video-ranking/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/alkaline-maniac-tops-itunes-reggae-music-video-ranking/ Alkaline topped the iTunes Reggae Music Videos chart this week. Vendetta’s new deejay video “Maniac” hits the top of the Reggae Music Videos charts on iTunes above Sean Paul, Mavado and Shaggy. Alkaline has been very successful in the charts thanks to its First price album released earlier this year. On October 19, his single […]]]>

Alkaline topped the iTunes Reggae Music Videos chart this week.

Vendetta’s new deejay video “Maniac” hits the top of the Reggae Music Videos charts on iTunes above Sean Paul, Mavado and Shaggy. Alkaline has been very successful in the charts thanks to its First price album released earlier this year. On October 19, his single “Maniac” became the # 1 bestselling reggae music video.

Alkaline’s manager / sister Kereen Beckford, who is one of her biggest supporters, had to take to Instagram to share the good news. “Thank you @xclusivemanagement for distributing the now number ONE selling Reggae Music Video Maniac on @itunes BigUp @ manhimselff Producedby @ generalrado @mauriceahr,” her sister shared in an Instagram post.

Likewise, its management also wanted to share its congratulations for the project. They said, “Thank you! For creating #Reggae history with us # Maniac @ itunes @manhimselff @ kereberry_new_era.ent.

For a while, Sean Paul dominated the charts with his contagious singles, “Temperature”, “Get Busy”, “Hot Gal”, “So Fine” and “Like Glue”. Many artists have a hard time trying to outdo these legendary tracks in sales and on the charts. However, Alkaline managed to outshine them for at least a day. The clip came out only a week ago and accomplished this great feat.

The visuals, produced by KingPride Productions, incorporated an all-black theme and highlighted the activist artist. The concept of the video revolves around his achievements, women and his invincibility with his lyrics, “Cream yeh di cream / How dem fi stop me? / Me a do dis from me a teen, yeah-ayy / I morph into a maniac. “

Top Prize is one of the most aired albums on Audiomack, has also collected four Billboard charts, and it bills itself as an album beast. The album was released on May 14 and it’s still causing a stir on many charts. Although it had no collaborations and was independently produced, the album produced another Billboard plaque to be ranked # 2 on the Billboard Reggae Charts.

Alkaline also released the music video for the album’s “Medicine” in July. Fans eagerly awaited more music videos from his album, Top Prize, and were more than grateful to see the profound visual of “Maniac.” Medicine, with over 3 million views on YouTube, is a powerhouse in its own right. , and it completely contradicts “Maniac” with its party feel-good vibe.

Top 10 iTunes Reggae charts:

  1. “Maniac” by Alkaline
  2. “Temperature (with Breakout Outro)” by Sean Paul
  3. “Take care” of Sean Paul
  4. “Hot Gal / Deport em (Uncategorized Version)” by Sean Paul
  5. “So Fine (Bonus Track)” by Sean Paul
  6. “Light Me Up” by Kevin Lyttle
  7. “Like Glue” by Sean Paul
  8. Shaggy’s “What’s Love” (feat. Akon)
  9. “Mamacita” by Collie Budzz
  10. “So special” by Mavado



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Usain Bolt Rises to Top of Reggae Music Charts with Debut Album https://reggae-shack.com/usain-bolt-rises-to-top-of-reggae-music-charts-with-debut-album/ https://reggae-shack.com/usain-bolt-rises-to-top-of-reggae-music-charts-with-debut-album/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/usain-bolt-rises-to-top-of-reggae-music-charts-with-debut-album/ Usain Bolt The Thom brand Usain Bolt, the fastest man in the world and an Olympic icon, innovates in a field that extends beyond sport. Since retiring from sprinting, he has made a smooth transition to music. Growing up in Sherwood Content, Jamaica, the sport-obsessed boy has always had a passion for music, dating back […]]]>

Usain Bolt, the fastest man in the world and an Olympic icon, innovates in a field that extends beyond sport. Since retiring from sprinting, he has made a smooth transition to music. Growing up in Sherwood Content, Jamaica, the sport-obsessed boy has always had a passion for music, dating back to his first meeting at a round robin – essentially a party sponsored by local citizens who put on money together – where he heard from popular reggae artists like Barrington Levy and Bob Marley. This is where his love of music began, according to him.

After his last race in 2017, he was busy working with his sponsors, which included Puma, Gatorade, Visa and Hublot. It was only after living independently in Kingston, Jamaica, that he decided to pursue his musical career. Bolt co-produced three dancehall mixtapes in 2019: Olympe Rose Riddim, Immortal Riddim, and Mechanical riddim. “Even though I co-produced these albums, I didn’t feel like people took me seriously in the music business; they always saw me as a simple athlete. Putting my own album together seemed like a good way to show how serious I was with music. During the pandemic, Bolt and his longtime friend and manager Nugent “NJ” Walker set out to record a full-length reggae / dancehall album in Kingston, which they titled Yutes Country after their Jamaican roots.

“If you’ve followed my career over the years, you’ve probably noticed that I still dance and listen to music. It’s no secret that I love music. Music has always been part of my DNA, ”Bolt shares.

His real ambition is to become the Dancehall equivalent of Dj Khaled, which he is well on his way to achieving. Yutes Country debuted on Billboard’s Top Ten Reggae Albums with co-signings from Apple Music, Spotify, Tidal and Audiomack. The album has since climbed to the top of the Amazon Music charts since its release on September 3. “We have sought to cater for a wide range of tastes. Listeners will be taken on a journey through reggaeton, r & b and hip hop sounds on this album. Bolt describes the inspirational song “Living The Dream” as one of his favorites, adding, “We created the song to help inspire young children, hoping that they will never give up on their dreams, make it through life and dedicate themselves to it. to a trade. “


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Hiss Golden Messenger’s MC Taylor ‘Reggae Music Saved My Life’ (With Playlist) https://reggae-shack.com/hiss-golden-messengers-mc-taylor-reggae-music-saved-my-life-with-playlist/ https://reggae-shack.com/hiss-golden-messengers-mc-taylor-reggae-music-saved-my-life-with-playlist/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 14:56:26 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/hiss-golden-messengers-mc-taylor-reggae-music-saved-my-life-with-playlist/ Photo credit: Cris Frisina The golden messenger of the whistle the leader continues with som’s helpe sweet Jamaican soundds. I’ve listened to a lot of music over the past year and a half, and most of it was reggae. Specifically, the songs I listened to were of the roots or Rastafarian devotion variety, recorded roughly […]]]>

Photo credit: Cris Frisina

The golden messenger of the whistle the leader continues with som’s helpe sweet Jamaican soundds.

I’ve listened to a lot of music over the past year and a half, and most of it was reggae. Specifically, the songs I listened to were of the roots or Rastafarian devotion variety, recorded roughly between 1970 and 1985 in Kingston and the surrounding area, Jamaica, but sometimes also in small makeshift studios in Toronto or New York. York. I’ve been drawn to reggae music since the day I left high school with my friend Aaron Thompson and he played me his brother’s Burning Spear copy. Marcus Garvey while we were smoking cigarettes around his pool. In retrospect, it was a bit like tripping over the Rosetta Stone on my first day as an intern on an archaeological dig. Marcus Garvey remains, in my opinion, one of the highlights of recorded music – a haunting, gleefully righteous, deeply funky melodic elegy about slavery, liberation, joy, and faith. A bell rang that day which continues to vibrate in my life.

In my early twenties and seriously collecting records, we were in the midst of one of the first golden years of reggae reissues, led largely by the late Blood & Fire Records, an iconic label whose images cover alone was a seal of approval for reggae newbies and serious heads. It was around this time that I bought King Tubby’s Freedom Sounds in Dub, a collection of deeply hallucinogenic and hypnotic reworking of tunes from the chests of Bertram Brown’s Freedom Sounds label. I couldn’t have asked for a better introduction to the world of dub music, a subgenre of reggae in which multitrack recordings, usually songs already released, are recycled, remixed and processed with shimmering layers of reverb and of delay. Then they are filtered until it becomes difficult to determine where the original version ends and where the dub version begins, as on “Ites Green and Gold” by Johnny Clarke and “Rebel Music” by Bob Marley. The vocals are often removed and sometimes new melodies or new instruments are added, essentially creating an entirely new song. Like playing music on the phone, it can become difficult to remember what the original melody was. I can think of at least half a dozen different songs that are built on Lloyd Parks’ “Slaving” beat – my favorite being Sylford Walker’s “Chant Down Babylon” – with completely different melodies and lyrics. Tubby, born Osbourne Ruddock in Kingston, Jamaica, elevated this type of remix to major art. This is the reason why his name is King.

Shortly after purchase Sounds of freedom, I was rummaging through the dusty Discount Records trash cans near Harbor Boulevard in Costa Mesa when I found Trojan Records’ Upsetter box, a classic collection containing three of producer Lee “Scratch” Perry’s debut records with his band The Upsetters. It was almost time for the store to close, and I could tell the teenager behind the counter wanted to get rid of me so he could lock up. “How much does it cost?” I asked in as neutral a tone as possible, not wanting to betray my excitement.

“How many records are there?” He replied without interest.

“Three,” I said, holding my breath.

“Ten cents per record. Thirty cents.

I paid with two quarters and walked out, as if I had just robbed a bank.

If King Tubby’s offerings are the equivalent of hydroponic weed grown with almost surgical precision for maximum existential impact, then Perry’s music – especially the material he recorded in his haunted Black Ark home studio – more like wild-grown psilocybin mushrooms. By that I mean he’s unpredictable, temperamental, chaotic, gnomic, sometimes darkly funny or afraid of claustrophobia. In my opinion, no collection is complete without a copy of Heart of Congo, a strange record that Scratch produced around 1976 for the Rastafarian harmony duo Les Congos. Heart of Congo is, in essence, a gospel record that moves in a wet rhythm under dark and ominous clouds; it looks like it was made at the end of time, and its odd mix of joyful devotion and Old Testament apocalypse is totally unique. Lee “Scratch” Perry’s chests appear to be bottomless. I recently discovered a recording of his title Megaton Dub– after being a fan for over two decades – that I would put up with the best of his work. And labels like the great Pressure Sounds have created a cottage industry by collecting their most obscure singles for compilations like Roaring lion and The return of Scratch Sound System, all of which are worth hearing.

What Tubby and Scratch – and indeed everyone who made reggae records in Jamaica in the 1970s, as far as I know – share a deep affinity for the[1]Pocket groove known as one-drop, in which the bass drum emphasizes the third beat and the rhythm dances on the top hat. For an American drummer, it can feel like playing backwards. The other day my 12 year old son and I were listening to a Mighty Diamonds record and he said, “All these drummers play the same beat, don’t they? He could hear how central one-drop was in the world of reggae.

Last year I went further down the reggae rabbit hole than ever before. Part of the reason is that it was like a beautiful world to lose myself in for a time that seemed to bring only bad news. Getting into the weeds with any subject is like learning a language, and reggae is no different: the deeper you go, the more nuance you hear. Leroy “Horsemouth” Wallace plays his drum fills in a loose and elongated way that sets them apart from those of Carly Barrett or Sly Dunbar. Bullwackie’s production technique is different from that of Niney, Phil Pratt, or Glen Brown. It’s a fun, albeit arcane, knowledge to possess. It’s been a year of great discovery for me, and I feel like I regularly stumble upon masterpieces, like “Put These Fools” just from The Tidals or “Creation” by Itopia, which I don’t had never heard before. Any record head knows this type of joyous fervor.

It is important to recognize that as a white American man, I have been the beneficiary of the oppressive systems against which much of the most powerful reggae music, certainly of the roots variety, works in opposition. When Yabby You sings “Chant Down Babylon Kingdom”, he talks about the dismantling of the evil institutions of white supremacy that allowed black people to be mistreated and murdered by the police. He sings about being denied even the most basic human rights in broad daylight. As a reggae fan who happens to be white, this is good and necessary to keep in mind.

At the same time, so many of the themes tackled by reggae – persistence, hope, liberation, justice and devotion – felt more deeply universal than ever in the past year. Maybe that’s why I keep coming back to it day after day; Reggae offers the most informative and cutting-edge commentary on what it means to keep going. In a year of so much suffering, individually and collectively, this was the soundtrack I needed. And in 20 years, if someone asks me how I got through the year of the global pandemic, I will say, “I listened to reggae music.

***

MC Taylor’s project Hiss Golden Messenger released their latest LP, Quietly Blowing It, in June. Taylor’s curated reggae playlist appears below.


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Pedro World Citizen unites people with reggae music https://reggae-shack.com/pedro-world-citizen-unites-people-with-reggae-music/ https://reggae-shack.com/pedro-world-citizen-unites-people-with-reggae-music/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/pedro-world-citizen-unites-people-with-reggae-music/ Pedro encourages people to see the world as our common home and to see us as a citizen of the world. United States, October 3, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – Pedro, with his moving message and his world reggae sound, invites people of all cultures and backgrounds to collaborate for the greater good of humanity. Planet Earth, […]]]>

Pedro encourages people to see the world as our common home and to see us as a citizen of the world.

United States, October 3, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – Pedro, with his moving message and his world reggae sound, invites people of all cultures and backgrounds to collaborate for the greater good of humanity. Planet Earth, “our common home”, should be united by a single banner: Citizen of the World, our human right.

Bring unity through music and ceremony
Pedro’s music is an uplifting celebration of love and life by creating an inviting and sacred space during performances. An acacia table with special elements is placed as an offering, each with its own special meaning. Pedro explains that the “Bowl of Water reflects the infinite abundance of our offering and what we cultivate with the intention of our heart. A burning candle lights up the purpose of our life, guiding us and reminding us of who we really are. The burning of incense inspires us to lift up every word, thought and action. A loaf of bread is a symbol of unity, representing unity and the coexistence of life.

Like a rising reggae artist, Pedro identified with global reggae as a genre deeply rooted in issues of spirituality, social change and unity. On religious, racial, gender and political issues, Pedro advocates for a better understanding of our diverse humanity. By being more open to the experiences of others, we can better recognize each other.

Who is Pedro
As a child, Pedro wanted peace in the world. He sees people as part of the same human family, no matter where we come from or what we believe. This desire inspired Pedro to believe that one day he would be able to design a more inclusive global voting system that truly included all people around the world. “If we give everyone a direct voice in global affairs, we will have a more unified global voice. Pedro works not only to reconcile opposing worldviews, but also to learn more about various aspects of our common global culture.

Pedro has traveled to 34 countries during his life, broadening his perspective of the world and transforming him into a citizen of the world. This journey has taken him to perform and record songs based on a wide range of meaningful and sacred scriptures incorporating different perspectives from various continents across the world. He is committed to continuing to share messages of unity in the healing power of music. During his life he taught music in more than a dozen cities to children, youth and adults while encouraging them to play in their local communities. It also creates, coordinates and organizes artists, providing opportunities, platforms and resources to uplift and inspire others. Through all of his efforts to help provide more opportunities to others, he has established himself as an entrepreneur.

What’s next for Pedro
Pedro is currently performing in various venues across the Pacific Northwest, gaining support from others who also see themselves as citizens of the world. It nourishes the hope that one day soon we will no longer be divided by religion, nationality, race or gender.

Pedro was the headliner of the World Beat Festival, one of Oregon’s largest multicultural events, attracting over 25,000 visitors each year; performed on the main stage of Make Music Day, attracting a large number of musicians and audiences from all over the world; and the Northwest World Reggae Festival with some of the best reggae artists in the world.

By the end of 2021, Pedro will be releasing his next album “Shine” with the next trend in the “World Citizen” merchandise.

If you want to learn more about Pedro World Citizen or catch his next performance, follow him on any major social media platform at @ifollowpedro.

Pedro
Luminus editions
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Listen to the conscious stream of reggae music with Jahi Israel’s new track “Oppression” https://reggae-shack.com/listen-to-the-conscious-stream-of-reggae-music-with-jahi-israels-new-track-oppression/ Thu, 30 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/listen-to-the-conscious-stream-of-reggae-music-with-jahi-israels-new-track-oppression/ Open your mind and soul to the musical, lyrical and thematic awareness of the reggae artist Jahi Israel and its undulating melodic waves in its song, ‘Oppression‘. Reggae music artist Jahi Israel is here to present to the world a new approach to conscious music leading to personal and social growth. He released his song, […]]]>

Open your mind and soul to the musical, lyrical and thematic awareness of the reggae artist Jahi Israel and its undulating melodic waves in its song, ‘Oppression‘.

Reggae music artist Jahi Israel is here to present to the world a new approach to conscious music leading to personal and social growth. He released his song, ‘Oppression‘showcasing elements of spirituality, humanity and existentialism in a magnificent stream of reggae music. His music has a purpose of its own and addresses the global audience with regard to cultural, spiritual and social harmony. Part of the Rastafarian religion, his music carries a sublime notion and adheres to an unlimited flow of consciousness through the music.

The song highlights certain truths and realities allowing its audience to find themselves and therefore to close themselves. Rich in words and themes, he always tries to defend the rights of people in his community and all who are oppressed in the world. Track ‘Oppression‘has just kicked off a movement in his career as he aims to broaden his soundscape to reach more people. He soaks up his ideas, perspectives and the teaching of Rastafarian to lead the way through his music and soundscape. His art is not only for melodic or recreational purposes, but allows men to find the true meaning and essence of life.

Artist Jahi Israel was associated with the Gold Heart studio run by Vince McMahon in Manhattan, which gave it visibility and a platform to showcase its goals. His inspiration for writing music comes from observing everyday life and being aware of current events happening around us. The sense of conscious music through the verses of reggae and Rastafarian religion will allow him to achieve his goals. Listen to his songs on Apple Music to open up your own perspectives and challenges in life and the world.


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Miss Pat Chin – My Reggae Music Journey https://reggae-shack.com/miss-pat-chin-my-reggae-music-journey/ https://reggae-shack.com/miss-pat-chin-my-reggae-music-journey/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 15:45:06 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/miss-pat-chin-my-reggae-music-journey/ Subscribe to our Policy NewsletterNY for the latest coverage and to stay informed about the 2021 elections in your district and across New York Jamaican American Miss Patricia Chin has published her seminal autobiography of her musical journey through the evolution of Reggae music and beyond. Her memoir “Miss Pat Chin – My Reggae Music […]]]>