Jamaican movies – Reggae Shack http://reggae-shack.com/ Fri, 13 May 2022 00:39:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://reggae-shack.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile-120x120.png Jamaican movies – Reggae Shack http://reggae-shack.com/ 32 32 Caribbean Films and Voices in the Film Industry https://reggae-shack.com/caribbean-films-and-voices-in-the-film-industry/ Tue, 10 May 2022 21:38:38 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/caribbean-films-and-voices-in-the-film-industry/ [SOUTH FLORIDA] – The Hollywood movie machine has taken some tentative steps to increase diversity. Mainly with black actors, stories and cultural representation. However, Afro-Caribbean representation in the film industry has not been a priority. Whether from a public point of view or from an industrial point of view. Much of the media attention has […]]]>

[SOUTH FLORIDA] – The Hollywood movie machine has taken some tentative steps to increase diversity. Mainly with black actors, stories and cultural representation. However, Afro-Caribbean representation in the film industry has not been a priority. Whether from a public point of view or from an industrial point of view. Much of the media attention has focused on the overwhelming whiteness of the Oscar award ceremonies and the films themselves.

The call to use Jamaicans will play Jamaicans in movies is not something new.

With an ever-increasing emphasis on diversity and appropriate representation of different cultures on screen, it’s important to note that Black does not define a monolithic group. Tokenization is a problem; a film may mistakenly consider itself representative if there are one or two darker-skinned people. Unfortunately, this does not meet the objective of inclusion and representation of reality.

Afro-Caribbean voices in the film industry represent a large group of people who do not see characters who share their backgrounds and culture on the big screen. Even though the United States has the highest percentage of Afro-Caribbean residents outside of the region itself, the largest film center fails to offer representative roles appropriately.

Increase Afro-Caribbean representation in the film industry

Like most burgeoning changes, the push for greater representation of Caribbean heritage in film begins with a small, dedicated group. Sade Claken Joseph, owner of production company Out of Many Media, recently held a short film screening at the Soho House in Los Angeles to screen a short film titled “Belonging.” This not only provided an opportunity to see Afro-Caribbean voices on screen, but it also opened up a dialogue about past experiences and a smart path to more inclusive practices.

Film inspired by Wyclef, The Sweetest Girl, won a few accolades last year. The trend is for greater Caribbean representation in the film industry. An essential step.

Inclusion means little if representation suffers. Not only does the Band-Aid solution of throwing a few darker-skinned characters into a movie fail to represent black culture as a whole, having black characters fails to provide representation for legacies. specific to this group. Afro-Caribbeans have a different history, cultural range, and current circumstances than African-Americans. Accuracy is important when it comes to improving the characters people see on screen. Ky-mani Marley debuted as an actor, writer and director last year.

All the misrepresentations in the popular media turn the minds of the uneducated into truth. Erasing an important culture from all films makes it impossible for people who do not know Afro-Caribbeans personally to recognize and understand them. Representing people from diverse backgrounds and cultures humanizes them with precision and respect. Especially in a way that most people won’t get to experience in the real world.

We’ve come a long way from the best Jamaican films will premiere at the Toronto Film Festival in 2006.

Short films and small independent film production companies like Out of Many Pictures of media and mental telepathy, owned by a Jamaican American by the name of Robert A. Maylor, offers a lot when it comes to encouraging inclusion and authentic representation in films. As more emphasis is placed on diversity, Afro-Caribbean voices in Hollywood will become stronger and more recognizable. This requires authenticity and a focus on the real experiences and cultural identity of the people of the Caribbean islands. It cannot fall back on the superficial solutions of symbolism and monolithic black identities as Hollywood has been guilty of for far too long.

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10 noir travel movies that capture the beauty of summer https://reggae-shack.com/10-noir-travel-movies-that-capture-the-beauty-of-summer/ Mon, 09 May 2022 23:18:02 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/10-noir-travel-movies-that-capture-the-beauty-of-summer/ Directed by John Singleton, Poetic Justice became an instant noir classic when it was released in 1993. Not only does the film capture the beauty of summer, it also features an all-star cast including Janet Jackson, Tupac Shakur, Regina King and Joe Torry. Centered on a young black woman named Justice played by Jackson, Poetic […]]]>

Directed by John Singleton, Poetic Justice became an instant noir classic when it was released in 1993. Not only does the film capture the beauty of summer, it also features an all-star cast including Janet Jackson, Tupac Shakur, Regina King and Joe Torry.

Centered on a young black woman named Justice played by Jackson, Poetic Justice follows the young woman’s struggle with depression after the loss of her boyfriend to gun violence. To deal with the murder, Justice can be heard reciting her poetry throughout the film. Hoping to cheer up her friend, King invites Justice to join her boyfriend (Torry) and her friend (Shakur) on a road trip from South Central LA to Oakland in a mail truck. Having to go to Oakland for a hair salon but without means of transport, Justice obliges and their adventure begins.

Poetic Justice is a beautiful film that captures the essence of black culture in the 90s and the magnificence of Summertime on the West Coast. The journey from South Central to Oakland takes viewers through incredible landscapes in California and glimpses of mountain ranges and ocean views can be seen throughout the film. One of the most iconic moments in Poetic Justice is the family reunion scene. A nostalgic moment for viewers, this scene takes you back to that time when life was simpler and family mattered. Poetic Justice is the West Coast travel movie you must have in your collection.

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Queen’s home movies will be in a new documentary for Jubilee https://reggae-shack.com/queens-home-movies-will-be-in-a-new-documentary-for-jubilee/ Mon, 09 May 2022 00:19:52 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/queens-home-movies-will-be-in-a-new-documentary-for-jubilee/ A still from the ‘Elizabeth: The Unseen Queen’ video of Princess Elizabeth, 20, during a visit to South Africa in 1947. A new documentary to be released will reveal never-before-seen footage of Queen Elizabeth II. The BBC had wide access to a huge archive of home-made films shot by the Queen, her parents and her […]]]>

A still from the ‘Elizabeth: The Unseen Queen’ video of Princess Elizabeth, 20, during a visit to South Africa in 1947. A new documentary to be released will reveal never-before-seen footage of Queen Elizabeth II. The BBC had wide access to a huge archive of home-made films shot by the Queen, her parents and her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh. The film is being made in conjunction with the upcoming Queen’s Platinum Jubilee celebrations. (The Royal Collection via BBC Studios via AP)

LONDON (AP) — Never-before-seen home films from Queen Elizabeth II’s personal archive — including footage capturing the monarch as a young mother and beaming at her engagement ring — will be featured in a new documentary, the court announced Sunday. BBC.

The Queen has granted the broadcaster unprecedented access to hundreds of home movies shot by her, her parents and her late husband Prince Philip as part of her upcoming Platinum Jubilee celebrations, honoring her 70 years on the throne .

The videos record the Queen’s life from when she was a baby in a pram to her coronation in 1953.

A clip captured Philip’s first extended visit to Balmoral Castle in Scotland in 1946, before his engagement to Elizabeth became public knowledge. The footage shows a beaming Princess Elizabeth showing off her engagement ring to the camera.

Philip and Elizabeth married in November 1947 and were married for 73 years, until Philip died last April, just months before his 100th birthday.

Simon Young, BBC history editor, said the broadcaster was honored to have access to the Queen’s personal film collection.

“This documentary is an extraordinary glimpse into a deeply personal side of the royal family that is rarely seen, and it’s wonderful to be able to share it with the nation as we celebrate its platinum jubilee,” he said. .

“Elizabeth: The Unseen Queen” will air in the UK on May 29, ahead of a week of nationwide celebrations to mark the Queen’s 70 years on the throne.

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DVD REVIEW: ‘Race’ doesn’t tell the whole Jesse Owens story | Movies https://reggae-shack.com/dvd-review-race-doesnt-tell-the-whole-jesse-owens-story-movies-2/ Mon, 02 May 2022 20:52:53 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/dvd-review-race-doesnt-tell-the-whole-jesse-owens-story-movies-2/ BRUCE R. MILLER Since leaving “Saturday Night Live,” Jason Sudeikis has had a lot of work, mostly in comedies, but some in dramas like “Race.” As Jesse Owens’ coach, he’s a little out of place, but ready for anything, especially since the film is a respectful biography of great athletics. Because it focuses on his […]]]>

BRUCE R. MILLER

Since leaving “Saturday Night Live,” Jason Sudeikis has had a lot of work, mostly in comedies, but some in dramas like “Race.”

As Jesse Owens’ coach, he’s a little out of place, but ready for anything, especially since the film is a respectful biography of great athletics.

Because it focuses on his time at the 1936 Olympics, it doesn’t address any of the turmoil he faced later in life or the price he paid for being such an iconic athlete. Arguably a better movie — especially one titled “Race” — could have charted his post-Olympic career and the things he did to keep his family afloat.

The film – directed by Stephen Hopkins – also leaves unanswered questions about Leni Riefenstahl, the Nazi filmmaker who captured the games and had a brief encounter with Owens. While ‘Race’ insists Adolf Hitler snubbed the athlete after his impressive performance, Owens maintained the German leader shook his hand – and there was a photo to prove it.

People also read…

More research might have given this the edge of “Selma” or the depth of “Ray”. Instead, it’s like a Lifetime movie, eager to justify a bloated soundtrack.

Newcomer Stephen James is a good choice to play Owens. He has the athleticism and demeanor to suggest someone under pressure. Sudeikis, meanwhile, looks set to add “just kidding” to his line-readings. One day, maybe, he can shake off his comedic identity and achieve something like this. But “Race” is not the place.

Dozens of actors come to mind who would be much better in the role.

While Jeremy Irons and William Hurt are floundering as U.S. Olympic officials, they don’t really add to Owens’ story, especially as the final cards indicate what was at stake for Irons’ Avery Brundage. .

Like “42,” the Jackie Robinson story, “Race” tries to simplify a lot of things that really aren’t. This reduces the NAACP to a brief encounter; it doesn’t explain why Franklin Roosevelt didn’t salute Owens after his big victory.

A rivalry with Germany’s Carl “Luz” Long, however, is well played and helps to show that the 1936 matches weren’t necessarily an “us versus them” situation. David Kross does a great job as Long, complementing James in the best way possible.

As screen biographies go, “Race” couldn’t be more honorable. It gives Owens the limelight, showcases his humble demeanor and allows his family to register in a way most don’t.

But he’s not just another Eddie the Eagle or a member of the Jamaican bobsled team. This is Jesse Owens, a true legend who deserves the best in Hollywood.

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DVD REVIEW: ‘Race’ doesn’t tell the whole Jesse Owens story | Movies https://reggae-shack.com/dvd-review-race-doesnt-tell-the-whole-jesse-owens-story-movies-3/ Mon, 02 May 2022 18:12:50 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/dvd-review-race-doesnt-tell-the-whole-jesse-owens-story-movies-3/ BRUCE R. MILLER Since leaving “Saturday Night Live,” Jason Sudeikis has had a lot of work, mostly in comedies, but some in dramas like “Race.” As Jesse Owens’ coach, he’s a little out of place, but ready for anything, especially since the film is a respectful biography of great athletics. Because it focuses on his […]]]>

BRUCE R. MILLER

Since leaving “Saturday Night Live,” Jason Sudeikis has had a lot of work, mostly in comedies, but some in dramas like “Race.”

As Jesse Owens’ coach, he’s a little out of place, but ready for anything, especially since the film is a respectful biography of great athletics.

Because it focuses on his time at the 1936 Olympics, it doesn’t address any of the turmoil he faced later in life or the price he paid for being such an iconic athlete. Arguably a better movie — especially one titled “Race” — could have charted his post-Olympic career and the things he did to keep his family afloat.

The film – directed by Stephen Hopkins – also leaves unanswered questions about Leni Riefenstahl, the Nazi filmmaker who captured the games and had a brief encounter with Owens. While ‘Race’ insists Adolf Hitler snubbed the athlete after his impressive performance, Owens maintained the German leader shook his hand – and there was a photo to prove it.

People also read…

More research might have given this the edge of “Selma” or the depth of “Ray”. Instead, it’s like a Lifetime movie, eager to justify a bloated soundtrack.

Newcomer Stephen James is a good choice to play Owens. He has the athleticism and demeanor to suggest someone under pressure. Sudeikis, meanwhile, looks set to add “just kidding” to his line-readings. One day, maybe, he can shake off his comedic identity and achieve something like this. But “Race” is not the place.

Dozens of actors come to mind who would be much better in the role.

While Jeremy Irons and William Hurt are floundering as U.S. Olympic officials, they don’t really add to Owens’ story, especially as the final cards indicate what was at stake for Irons’ Avery Brundage. .

Like “42,” the Jackie Robinson story, “Race” tries to simplify a lot of things that really aren’t. This reduces the NAACP to a brief encounter; it doesn’t explain why Franklin Roosevelt didn’t salute Owens after his big victory.

A rivalry with Germany’s Carl “Luz” Long, however, is well played and helps to show that the 1936 matches weren’t necessarily an “us versus them” situation. David Kross does a great job as Long, complementing James in the best way possible.

As screen biographies go, “Race” couldn’t be more honorable. It gives Owens the limelight, showcases his humble demeanor and allows his family to register in a way most don’t.

But he’s not just another Eddie the Eagle or a member of the Jamaican bobsleigh team. This is Jesse Owens, a true legend who deserves the best in Hollywood.

]]>
DVD REVIEW: ‘Race’ doesn’t tell the whole Jesse Owens story | Movies https://reggae-shack.com/dvd-review-race-doesnt-tell-the-whole-jesse-owens-story-movies/ Mon, 02 May 2022 17:35:52 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/dvd-review-race-doesnt-tell-the-whole-jesse-owens-story-movies/ BRUCE R. MILLER Since leaving “Saturday Night Live,” Jason Sudeikis has had a lot of work, mostly in comedies, but some in dramas like “Race.” As Jesse Owens’ coach, he’s a little out of place, but ready for anything, especially since the film is a respectful biography of great athletics. Because it focuses on his […]]]>

BRUCE R. MILLER

Since leaving “Saturday Night Live,” Jason Sudeikis has had a lot of work, mostly in comedies, but some in dramas like “Race.”

As Jesse Owens’ coach, he’s a little out of place, but ready for anything, especially since the film is a respectful biography of great athletics.

Because it focuses on his time at the 1936 Olympics, it doesn’t address any of the turmoil he faced later in life or the price he paid for being such an iconic athlete. Arguably a better movie — especially one titled “Race” — could have charted his post-Olympic career and the things he did to keep his family afloat.

The film – directed by Stephen Hopkins – also leaves unanswered questions about Leni Riefenstahl, the Nazi filmmaker who captured the games and had a brief encounter with Owens. While ‘Race’ insists Adolf Hitler snubbed the athlete after his impressive performance, Owens maintained the German leader shook his hand – and there was a photo to prove it.

People also read…

More research might have given this the edge of “Selma” or the depth of “Ray”. Instead, it’s like a Lifetime movie, eager to justify a bloated soundtrack.

Newcomer Stephen James is a good choice to play Owens. He has the athleticism and demeanor to suggest someone under pressure. Sudeikis, meanwhile, looks like he’s about to add “just kidding” to his line-readings. One day, maybe, he can shake off his comedic identity and achieve something like this. But “Race” is not the place.

Dozens of actors come to mind who would be much better in the role.

While Jeremy Irons and William Hurt are floundering as U.S. Olympic officials, they don’t really add to Owens’ story, especially as the final cards indicate what was at stake for Irons’ Avery Brundage. .

Like “42,” the Jackie Robinson story, “Race” tries to simplify a lot of things that really aren’t. This reduces the NAACP to a brief encounter; it doesn’t explain why Franklin Roosevelt didn’t salute Owens after his big victory.

A rivalry with Germany’s Carl “Luz” Long, however, is well played and helps to show that the 1936 matches weren’t necessarily an “us versus them” situation. David Kross does a great job as Long, complementing James in the best way possible.

As screen biographies go, “Race” couldn’t be more honorable. It gives Owens the limelight, showcases his humble demeanor and allows his family to register in a way most don’t.

But he’s not just another Eddie the Eagle or a member of the Jamaican bobsled team. This is Jesse Owens, a true legend who deserves the best in Hollywood.

]]>
9 Must-See Movies at the 2022 Hot Docs Hybrid Festival https://reggae-shack.com/9-must-see-movies-at-the-2022-hot-docs-hybrid-festival/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/9-must-see-movies-at-the-2022-hot-docs-hybrid-festival/ With 226 films from 63 countries, Hot Docs is back in theaters in Toronto after the pandemic moved the festival online for the past two years. But even still, the festival offers all of its films for streaming on its Hot Docs at Home platform. With so much to choose from, CBC has selected nine […]]]>

With 226 films from 63 countries, Hot Docs is back in theaters in Toronto after the pandemic moved the festival online for the past two years.

But even still, the festival offers all of its films for streaming on its Hot Docs at Home platform.

With so much to choose from, CBC has selected nine of the best – with themes ranging from political thrillers to international love stories – for your viewing pleasure as the festival begins today.

In the weeds

Broadcast across Canada for five days, starting April 29 at 9 a.m. ET (world premiere)

A story of David and Goliath in the footsteps of Dopesick, dark waters and Erin Brockovitch, In the weeds is a searing takedown of agrichemical company Monsanto and its flagship weedkiller, RoundUp, as well as an expose of corporate irresponsibility, health crises and environmental destruction.

Canadian director Jennifer Baichwal – who is now the first female director to open Hot Docs twice, after her 2009 film act of god – tells the story of Dewayne (Lee) Johnson, a former gardener who allegedly contracted cancer from RoundUp after learning it was safe enough to drink.

In a three-year project kept largely under wraps ahead of its Hot Docs premiere, Baichwal shows both the human cost of Johnson’s health struggle, as well as the legal struggles to bring a massive corporation to justice in a court case. historical. While you can watch the CBC Docs-commissioned film online across Canada, it will open the festival in person on Thursday, hit theaters May 20 in Toronto and Vancouver, and air September 16 on CBC and CBC Gem as season premiere of The passionate eye.


OKAY! The ASD group movie

Broadcast across Canada for five days, starting April 30 at 9 a.m. ET (world premiere)

A film about inclusion, independence, success and just being yourself, OKAY! The ASD group movie follows the titular band ASD (a reference to autism spectrum disorders) as the members assemble their first album of original songs, rehearse for their first live show, and attempt to explain the challenges and gifts of being an autistic musician.

The band is made up of four Toronto musicians on the spectrum: vocalist Rawan Tuffaha, keyboardist Ron Adea, guitarist Jackson Begley and drummer Spenser Murray. The documentary splits time between examining the content and creation of their music, as well as their personal stories.

While the end result might feel a little weak compared to other festival entries, many of which focus on high-profile global events and social justice issues, the deep dive into each of the film’s characters makes OKAY! more than worth it.


My old school

Broadcast across Canada for five days, starting May 2 at 9 a.m. ET. (Canadian premiere)

Alan Cumming appears in this still from the documentary My Old School. In the film, Cumming lip-syncs an audio interview given by Brian MacKinnon, a 30-year-old Scotsman who tricked a school into thinking he was a Canadian teenager. (bastard media)

My old school tells an almost unbelievable story, until you remember it’s happened many times before.

With parallels with those of 2012 the impostorthe subject of My old school — Brian MacKinnon, a then 30-year-old Scotsman — posed as a Canadian teenager, enrolled in a local school and kept the ruse for months before being arrested.

The film uses animation to retell segments set in 1993, as actor Alan Cumming lip-syncs an audio interview given to the filmmakers before MacKinnon decided he didn’t want his face shown. . Although the story is more ridiculous than insidious – MacKinnon was never even arrested, as he technically never committed a crime – the testimony of his classmates reveals a sometimes disturbing story of absurdity and failed ambition.


Navalny

Broadcast across Canada for five days, starting May 1 at 6:30 p.m. ET.

A fantastic documentary that highlights one of the most famous politicians on the planet, Navalny follows Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny as he rises up against Russian President Vladimir Putin, investigates his own assassination attempt, and ends up becoming a political prisoner.

While the documentary, created by Canadian filmmaker Daniel Roher, follows a period of Navalny’s life already widely documented and shared online by Navalny himself, Roher’s unfettered access and scrutiny offers something new. even to those who paid attention to it.

It’s a spy movie where spies are hunted, a murder mystery where the victim solves the crime, a political thriller but whose plot is true. Absolutely, Navalny is one of the most stunning documentaries in recent memory.


Million Dollar Pigeons

Broadcast across Canada for five days, starting April 30 at 9 a.m. ET (world premiere)

A scene from the documentary Million Dollar Pigeons is seen in this shot. The film delves into the world of international pigeon racing and the exorbitant prices offered to the best in the sport. (Images obscured)

For those looking for lighter fare, look no further than Million Dollar Pigeons. This Irish documentary about homing pigeons and the “hobbyists” who love them has plot lines, million-dollar auctions and even an apparent arch-villain – all coupled with subjects endlessly poking fun at their own obsession and, at times, even falling backwards from their chairs.

While the revelations that, yes, people are paying – and earning – hundreds of thousands of dollars in the high-stakes world of pigeon racing are shocking, Million Dollar Pigeons is a winner for its characters. No one seems capable of taking their job so seriously, despite the exorbitant prices; even after the South African Million Dollar Pigeon Race ended in scandal and corruption, no one seemed particularly bothered. Instead, they’re all laughing at the same joke as us.


Kids in the room: comic punks

Broadcast across Canada for five days, starting May 4 at 6:30 p.m. ET (Canadian premiere)

If you haven’t heard yet, Children in the room returns with a new season next month. And coinciding with these brand new episodes, a documentary about the show’s meteoric rise to success, the impact it’s had on just about every great comedian you can think of – and the aftermath it’s had. on the “Kids” themselves.

This is a fun watch accessible to long-time fans or newcomers to this sketch comedy, as well as Canadian comedy enthusiasts. There are a few moments of what feels like a genuine reflection on where and how things fell apart towards the end of their five seasons together, and the documentary doesn’t go too easy on its beloved subjects.


sexual healing

Broadcast across Canada for five days starting May 2 at 9 a.m. ET (international premiere)

sexual healing follows Evelien, a woman seeking a positive sexual experience, to see – as she puts it – if it makes her feel more whole.

The documentary follows Evelien’s investigation into what it will be like for her – as she uses a wheelchair and is prone to what she describes as “spasms”, making sex a logistical challenge, before finally s ‘set up on a service that connects people with disabilities with sex workers.

There’s a fun scene at a sex toy store, an agonizing first meeting of Evelien’s sex worker, and a few calls to friends to find out exactly what, how, and when this is all supposed to work. Evelien is a magnetic subject with intensely relatable questions and revelations about how sex changes the way we feel about our own bodies. Don’t miss this one.


don’t come looking for

Broadcast across Canada for five days starting May 3 at 9 a.m. ET. (World Premiere)

A scene from the documentary Don’t Come Searching shows migrant worker Delroy, right, with his partner Sophia. Delroy, who has terminal cancer, proposes to Sophia on one last trip home before her expected death. (Movies hands up)

don’t come looking for is a breathtaking look at love and death from Canadian director Andrew Moir. It follows Delroy, a migrant worker who spends six months a year farming in rural Ontario, on his final trip back to Jamaica. Delroy, who has terminal cancer, buys a ring for his partner of nine years before leaving Canada for the last time, then returns home to propose and spend time with his family before he dies.

There’s really no medical intervention in Delroy’s death. There’s no chemo or surgery, just a few prescription bottles and endless bottles of Ensure, and the documentary doesn’t try to politicize it. Instead, don’t come looking for is a simple yet heartbreaking love story. Sophia and Delroy’s journey is not one you will forget. Watch it with someone who doesn’t mind crying in front of you.


fire of love

Broadcast across Canada for five days starting April 30 at 9 a.m. ET. (Canadian premiere)

A still from the Fire of Love documentary is featured here. The documentary follows two French volcanologists who fall in love, before dying during an eruption in 1991. (National Geographic Documentary Films)

fire of love is an eccentric Wes-Anderson-esque documentary about two French volcanologists who fall in love and spend all their time working together. This is the story of husband and wife Maurice and Katia Krafft, who died in 1991 while filming an eruption. The documentary takes years of their jaw-dropping archival footage and photos and combines it with animation as well as charming TV interviews the couple gave. The story is quite slow and methodical, with poetic narration by Miranda July. It’s the one to watch out for when you’re looking for something soothing, but not if you’re feeling impatient.

The Kraffts were obsessed with studying volcanoes and getting as close to it as possible, and the documentary honors that with loads of volcano visuals, but it’s more interesting when the camera turns on the Kraffts themselves and reflects on the relationship between them.

The documentary could be a little shorter, but we wouldn’t spend so much time trying to understand such a charming and daring couple.

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50 Greatest Summer Movies Of All Time, Ranked https://reggae-shack.com/50-greatest-summer-movies-of-all-time-ranked/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 18:40:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/50-greatest-summer-movies-of-all-time-ranked/ Starring Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard and Harrison Ford, ‘American Graffiti’ marks George Lucas’ second feature film – just four years before he became a household name with ‘Star Wars’. The film is set on the last day of summer vacation in 1962 with Curt (Dreyfuss), Steve (Howard), Terry (Charles Martin Smith) and John (Paul Le […]]]>

Starring Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard and Harrison Ford, ‘American Graffiti’ marks George Lucas’ second feature film – just four years before he became a household name with ‘Star Wars’. The film is set on the last day of summer vacation in 1962 with Curt (Dreyfuss), Steve (Howard), Terry (Charles Martin Smith) and John (Paul Le Mat) driving around town listening to the radio, chatting with girls and participate in drag races.

With the film set over the course of an evening, you can sense how fleeting the freedom of summer can be – shown in the brief conversations captured as the cars pass each other. “American Graffiti” feels like a snapshot in time, with added significance in terms of the early 60s setting. Both in music and world events, it was a decade of great change and transition, and this film conveys the remaining elements of 50s-inspired culture, about to be phased out. When it comes to films that effectively portray the last day of summer and its connection to the coming-of-age trope, “American Graffiti” sets the bar incredibly high for other films that use similar ideas and remains one of the best movies. on youth culture.

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10 James Bond Movies With The Best Love Stories https://reggae-shack.com/10-james-bond-movies-with-the-best-love-stories/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 18:30:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/10-james-bond-movies-with-the-best-love-stories/ Given the one-dimensional nature of the average “Bond girl” archetype, romantic subplots tend to rank among the weakest and most forgettable aspects of James Bond films. Audiences typically go to Bond films to enjoy the globe-trotting spy action. The romances tend to just add a dash of sauce to each movie without distracting from the […]]]>

Given the one-dimensional nature of the average “Bond girl” archetype, romantic subplots tend to rank among the weakest and most forgettable aspects of James Bond films. Audiences typically go to Bond films to enjoy the globe-trotting spy action. The romances tend to just add a dash of sauce to each movie without distracting from the bombastic, weaponized sets.

RELATED: 10 Dumbest James Bond Movies

But in a handful of Bond adventures, from Casino Royale for The Spy Who Loved Me for On Her Majesty’s Secret Servicethe love stories are truly captivating.

ten The Living Daylights (1987)


TImothy Dalton as James Bond and Maryam d'Abo as Kara Milovy on the Cello Case in Living Daylight

The first of two Bond films by Timothy Dalton, Living daylights, paired him with cellist Kara Milovy. Initially, she is the villainous General Koskov’s girlfriend, but she later becomes Bond’s love interest. The movie has a lot of fun with his career as a cellist. At one point, Bond and his latest girlfriend ride his cello case up the side of a mountain to escape some nefarious villains.

The two reunite in the final scene when Bond sneaks into a Vienna concert hall to see Kara perform as a solo cellist, then surprises her in her dressing room.

9 Specter (2015)


James Bond and Madeleine Swann - Specter

The second Bond of Sam Mendes, Spectrum, was nowhere near as critically acclaimed as his first. But one of the film’s few highlights, along with Dave Bautista’s sinister turn as Mr. Hinx’s henchman, is the stellar romantic chemistry shared by Daniel Craig and Léa Seydoux.

Seydoux plays Dr. Madeleine Swann, Mr. White’s daughter who grew up to be a psychiatrist. After everything that happened between him and Mr. White, Bond feels guilty and therefore feels responsible for protecting Madeleine.


VIDEO OF THE DAY

8 Golden Eye (1995)


There’s a genuine love interest in golden eye, but she’s overshadowed by Alec Trevelyan’s top henchman, Xenia Onatopp. Onatopp is a true femme fatale who crushes men to death with her thighs during sex.

RELATED: 10 Ways GoldenEye Is Pierce Brosnan’s Best Bond Movie

In addition to the utterly unique and hilariously pulpy character, Onatopp’s role in golden eye is greatly boosted by the searing on-screen chemistry between Pierce Brosnan and Famke Janssen.


7 For Your Eyes Only (1981)


Roger Moore in For Your Eyes Only

After moonraker was criticized for taking 007 into space, the producers returned to the franchise’s roots with a classic revenge story. In Just for your eyesBond teams up with Melina Havelock, who is on a narrow quest for revenge against the hitman who killed her parents in front of her on the family yacht.

Even Bond is disturbed by Havelock’s vengeful rage. This film – particularly in its romance arc – explores the concept of revenge in greater depth than Bond films usually do. 007 insists that revenge is fleeting and eye-for-an-eye punishment will provide no real closure.


6 No Time to Die (2021)


Daniel Craig Lea Seydoux James Bond Madeleine No Time To Die

Although a rarity for the Bond franchise, the most recent entry – no time to diethe bittersweet finale of the Craig era – follows on from Spectrum as 007’s romance with Dr. Madeleine Swann is stronger than ever. They take a romantic trip to Italy and apparently have a good time there, until Bond is tricked into believing that Madeleine betrayed him to Blofeld. After that, he outruns SPECTER’s assassins and abandons him on a train.

Heartbreakingly, Bond realizes five years later that not only is Madeleine innocent; he fathered a daughter, Mathilde, just before leaving her. It’s not just a romantic love story; it is also a father-daughter love story.


5 The World Is Not Enough (1999)


Elektra King - The World Is Not Enough

In Pierce Brosnan’s third Bond, The world is not enough007 is tasked with protecting oil heiress Elektra King when she is threatened by Renard, the world’s most wanted terrorist.

This movie is set up like a riff on The bodyguard: part romantic drama, part action thriller. The plot offers a hard-hitting twist as Bond is shocked to learn that King was in cahoots with Renard all along and never really cared about him.


4 Dr. No (1962)


The very first Bond movie, Dr. No, remains one of the best entries in the series. He introduced the “Bond girl” trope with one of the most famous examples: Honey Ryder, a shell diver Bond meets while on a mission in Jamaica.

RELATED: 5 Ways Dr. No Established The Bonding Formula (& 5 Ways Goldfinger Perfected It)

For most of the film, Bond and Ryder are both in the same boat: they investigate Dr. No together, get captured by his henchmen together, and end up imprisoned together in Dr. No’s secret lair. two team up in the finale, which established one of the best parts of the “Bond girl” archetype: the love interest gets in on the action.




3 The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)


Barbara Bach as Anya Amasova in The Spy Who Loved Me

Sure The Spy Who Loved Me spotlights Bond’s love life – the clue is in the title. The film deviates greatly from the plot of the novel, but retains its emphasis on romance. In the film, Roger Moore’s Bond teams up with a Soviet spy with a common goal: Anya Amasova, better known as Agent XXX.

Amasova is paired with Bond when the British and Russian governments are attacked by the same enemy. It turns out that Bond murdered the love of his life on a previous mission, which presents a huge emotional hurdle to overcome.


2 Casino Royale (2006)


casino royale james bond shower vesper lynd

In many ways, Daniel Craig’s first Bond film, Casino Royale, acts as an origin story for the character. The film shows how he earned his 00 status and license to kill, not to mention his recklessness, icy demeanor, and grace under fire. The tragic romance with Vesper Lynd explains how 007 ended up becoming such a cold-hearted lover.

Bond falls so madly in love with Vesper that he quits MI6 just to spend more time hanging out with her. He is heartbroken to find out that she betrayed him, but later learns that she only betrayed him to save his life.


1 On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969)


The banter between Bond and his love interests usually brings to mind Howard Hawks’ goofy comedies, but George Lazenby’s one and only Bond movie – On Her Majesty’s Secret Service – is the furthest thing from a goofy comedy. It’s a romantic tragedy that sets up a perfect couple for a happy life together, then tears them apart with bloody disaster.

In Lazenby’s unique outing on Bond, not only does 007 fall in love; he’s getting married. Contessa Teresa di Vicenzo becomes Tracy Bond – but, tragically, only briefly. Most Bond movies end with a sex scene and a crude double-meaning, but this one ends with a heartbroken 007 cradling his dying wife after a drive-by shooting.

NEXT: 8 Most Moving James Bond Movies

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Head to the ‘Movies’ with a BC Jazz Performance | Music https://reggae-shack.com/head-to-the-movies-with-a-bc-jazz-performance-music/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 19:34:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/head-to-the-movies-with-a-bc-jazz-performance-music/ Music can add emotion and drama to a movie. Local audiences can experience a bit of that seriousness at “Jazz at the Movies” at Bakersfield College on Monday. The BC Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Combos’ one-night-only show will feature student ensembles led by Kris Tiner, Director of Jazz Studies and Head of the Performing Arts […]]]>

Music can add emotion and drama to a movie. Local audiences can experience a bit of that seriousness at “Jazz at the Movies” at Bakersfield College on Monday.

The BC Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Combos’ one-night-only show will feature student ensembles led by Kris Tiner, Director of Jazz Studies and Head of the Performing Arts Department, playing classic and exciting arrangements of film music, in addition to original student compositions.

“We are so happy to be back in the indoor theater for live audiences, Tiner said in a press release. “This program will have something for everyone, and it will be a lot of fun!”

The program will open with new student compositions from BC Jazz Combos, followed by selections from Duke Ellington’s score to Otto Preminger’s courtroom drama “Anatomy of a Murder,” which won a 1959 Grammy for Best Soundtrack Album. Other selections include two composed by Charles Mingus for John Cassavetes’ film “Shadows” and film music by Quincy Jones and Herbie Hancock.

The second half of the concert will feature big band arrangements of popular songs from “Casablanca”, “Austin Powers”, “Despicable Me 2”, “The Muppet Movie” and more.

“Jazz at the Movies” begins at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the indoor theater at the Edward Simonsen Performing Arts Center, 1801 Panorama Drive.

Admission is $12, $8 for students, staff, and seniors. Tickets are available at bcjazz.eventbrite.com and at the door.

For more information call 661-395-4313 or visit BCJazz.org.

Spring Choral Concert on Friday

If you must have music this week, Bakersfield College is also hosting its “I Have A Voice” Spring Choral Concert on Friday.

The show will feature a variety of selections “from energetic humor to soulful and thoughtful inspiration” from the BC College Choir, Chamber Singers and Renegade Chorus.

Selected sopranos and altos from area high schools will kick off the show. Many of those performing will move to British Columbia as students this fall and launch a brand new soprano and alto choir.

Also on the program, selections of works by Moira Smiley, Josquin des Prez, Levente Gyöngyösi, Jonathon Larson and traditional Jamaican and South African pieces.

The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Friday in the indoor theater, 1801 Panorama Drive.

Admission is $12, $8 for BC students, seniors, and staff. Tickets are available at bit.ly/bcchoir22 and at the door.

Those wishing to further support BC’s vocal studies program can opt for a Dinner & A Show ticket, which includes a pre-show meal one hour before the concert in the courtyard outside the arts center in the scene. Proceeds will benefit the Choral Studies Program’s European travel plans in 2023.

The cost is $25, with tickets available at the same link.

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