Jamaican food – Reggae Shack http://reggae-shack.com/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 10:39:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://reggae-shack.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile-120x120.png Jamaican food – Reggae Shack http://reggae-shack.com/ 32 32 Ena’s Caribbean Kitchen serves delicious homemade Jamaican cuisine https://reggae-shack.com/enas-caribbean-kitchen-serves-delicious-homemade-jamaican-cuisine/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 10:39:21 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/enas-caribbean-kitchen-serves-delicious-homemade-jamaican-cuisine/ G. A. Benton In these three words – “WE ARE LINDEN” – the impeccable T-shirt worn by a waiter inside Ena’s Caribbean cuisine said a lot. I would later learn that this server was Marlon Hayles, the restaurant’s general manager and son of its eponymous owner, Ena Hayles. Marlon’s shirt obviously expressed neighborhood pride, but […]]]>

G. A. Benton

In these three words – “WE ARE LINDEN” – the impeccable T-shirt worn by a waiter inside Ena’s Caribbean cuisine said a lot.

I would later learn that this server was Marlon Hayles, the restaurant’s general manager and son of its eponymous owner, Ena Hayles. Marlon’s shirt obviously expressed neighborhood pride, but it also conveyed support for the WE ARE LINDEN youth community outreach and mentorship organization that recently held its 7th Annual Linden Block Party.

The shirt could almost have commented on the highly rated restaurant as well. Established for about 20 years in a prominent corner of Linden (Cleveland and Myrtle Avenues), Ena’s Caribbean Kitchen is a neighborhood landmark where people from all walks of life turn up for delicious homemade Jamaican cuisine.

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This was evident on recent visits when various passers-by waved at me, asked how I was doing, and commented on the dishes I was tearing up on Ena’s convenient patio. Located near the parking lot behind the restaurant, the patio offers shaded, well-spaced picnic tables that make nice perches for lunch in good weather. These are convenient as Ena’s does not currently offer indoor seating.

Orders are taken at two counters inside the modestly sized restaurant. Ena’s interior could be described as no-frills, but it’s bright and tidy and you could – as Bob Marley once sang – “liven up yourself” with its reggae-happy soundtrack, its glossy paint green Jamaican flag and its framed flags of Caribbean nations.

A decoration speaks volumes about Ena’s status as a local icon: a photograph signed by Guy Fieri (didn’t someone say it looked like a Hot Wheels human car?), which featured Ena on her popular Food Network show “Diners, drive-ins and dives.”

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Sean Paul credits his youthful appearance to good Jamaican food, ‘No Botox’ https://reggae-shack.com/sean-paul-credits-his-youthful-appearance-to-good-jamaican-food-no-botox/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 15:16:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/sean-paul-credits-his-youthful-appearance-to-good-jamaican-food-no-botox/ Dancehall superstar Sean Paul attributed his youthful appearance to the “good food” he eats in Jamaica, not cosmetic procedures. According to The Sun, the No lies The artist, who turns 50 on January 9, “miraculously still looks younger than he is” and insisted, in an interview, that the secret to his appearance “is not not […]]]>

Dancehall superstar Sean Paul attributed his youthful appearance to the “good food” he eats in Jamaica, not cosmetic procedures.

According to The Sun, the No lies The artist, who turns 50 on January 9, “miraculously still looks younger than he is” and insisted, in an interview, that the secret to his appearance “is not not Botox”.

“Nah man, it comes from great food. Living in Jamaica, the lifestyle is different and I was blessed with that, Sean Paul had replied when asked whether or not he used the anti-wrinkle drug.

Sean also told the publication that despite his next big milestone, being his 50th birthday in January, it will be on a small scale because since he already parties every day, he will just be chilling with his family.

“With such a monumental day, it’s a big milestone, so I’m going to kick something off,” he said.

Contrary to his plans for next January, Sean Paul celebrated his 40th birthday with a party at the TAO in Las Vegas in 2013. At the time, after tasting signature dishes from the restaurant’s menu, he went to a booth Club VIPs. where he was joined by several friends, and later surprised club-goers with an impromptu performance of some of his hit songs, including The temperature, give it to me, like glue and give me lightaccording to vegasnews.com.

Sean-Paul

By elaborating on the theme of age, the To be busy The entertainer also opened up about why he put off starting a family until he was in his 40s.

“I have younger children because of the industry. I waited and worked a lot before it was time to start a family… Most of the parents of my children’s friends are around 20 years younger than me,” he said.

Although, according to him, “life on the road is hectic and keeps me on my toes”, the former Wolmer’s High School boy said he has no plans to retire from performing.

“It gets harder, but I never felt like I was saying ‘No, I’m not doing this anymore’. I have enough money but when I come home from a hard tour, I’m like “Let me rest. That rest is for a day or two and then I’m back in the studio. I always do it because I like it. Giving people that pleasure on stage really gets me going.” , did he declare.

In the meantime, Sean Paul shared clips and photos of his latest performances from his mainland European leg of his trio Sorcha tour, his last being his show on Saturday August 20 in Hasselt, Belgium.

“Man a gyalis, you could have the sugar, but not the daddy. Belgium, you were amazing, Amsterdam now,” he noted, followed by another clip of himself being hosted by Nigerian Afrobeats superstar Burna Boy at the Reggae Lakes festival in Amsterdam, which took place on Sunday night.

General to general respect due to Burna Boy,” he captioned the post.

He also shared video clips on his IG Stories, of a joint-burning Burna Boy dancing in a storm to give me the night and his fans singing word for word, his mega hit Temperature.

Sean Paul, who has previously performed at Rototom in Spain and Zamardi in Hungary, began the UK leg of the tour on Tuesday August 23. From then until Saturday September 3, he will perform in Newcastle, Leeds, Birmingham, London, Churchdown and Cardiff.

On Wednesday August 31, he will perform in Nottingham, then in Glasgow on September 1, then will end this stage on Saturday September 3 in Manchester, before leaving for the United States to make the headlines with Pitbull on the “Can’t Stop us now”.

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A Jamaican food truck has opened at the future site of a Bangor market https://reggae-shack.com/a-jamaican-food-truck-has-opened-at-the-future-site-of-a-bangor-market/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/a-jamaican-food-truck-has-opened-at-the-future-site-of-a-bangor-market/ A new convenience store and restaurant located in the former Six Miles Falls store off Broadway in Bangor has moved closer to opening, with the launch of its new Jamaican food truck. The Scotch Bonnet Food Truck, owned by Bethany Gregory, had its first official day on Wednesday, offering jerk chicken, oxtail, saltfish cakes and […]]]>

A new convenience store and restaurant located in the former Six Miles Falls store off Broadway in Bangor has moved closer to opening, with the launch of its new Jamaican food truck.

The Scotch Bonnet Food Truck, owned by Bethany Gregory, had its first official day on Wednesday, offering jerk chicken, oxtail, saltfish cakes and other Jamaican goodies for lunch and dinner. It will be open Wednesday and Thursday this week, with future hours posted on social media and on truck’s website.

Gregory, who over the winter announced she would open a store and food truck at 2354 Broadway in Bangor, initially hoped the food truck and Maine Market, her store, would open by July. But difficulties finding contractors, getting the necessary permits from the city, and the unexpected need to rezone the property pushed back the opening date of the store itself to the fall.

Luckily, Gregory said, she was able to keep the food truck running — despite another setback, when the custom-built meat smoker she bought for the truck was stolen from her driveway over July 4 weekend. An Ellsworth-based barbecue caterer let her borrow one of his smokers until she could buy a new one.

While the food truck is operational, Gregory is busy renovating the building at 2354 Broadway, which once housed the Six Mile Falls store, a longtime convenience store near the Bangor-Glenburn urban line that closed in 2019. Gregory has moved to Bangor over the winter, after years of operating a lunch cafe in bustling Provincetown, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod.

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Gar & Mar satisfies the taste of Jamaican cuisine at Berea: Around The Town https://reggae-shack.com/gar-mar-satisfies-the-taste-of-jamaican-cuisine-at-berea-around-the-town/ Fri, 15 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/gar-mar-satisfies-the-taste-of-jamaican-cuisine-at-berea-around-the-town/ BEREA, Ohio – What would entice a local couple to open a Jamaican restaurant here? Aside from the fact that Garry Lawson and his wife, Nadette James-Lawson, are native Caribbean Islanders, both originally from Jamaica and residents of Olmsted Falls since 1999, “there was no Jamaican restaurant in less than 50 miles from Berea,” Nadette […]]]>

BEREA, Ohio – What would entice a local couple to open a Jamaican restaurant here?

Aside from the fact that Garry Lawson and his wife, Nadette James-Lawson, are native Caribbean Islanders, both originally from Jamaica and residents of Olmsted Falls since 1999, “there was no Jamaican restaurant in less than 50 miles from Berea,” Nadette said. .

She noted that Garry had run a restaurant in Sanford, Florida, and is now a chef at Gar & Mar.

The couple opened their restaurant Berea on July 4 at 10 Seminary St. – the former location of Campus Grille. And if you find the name of their new restaurant, Gar & Mar, a little curious — like me — Nadette offered the explanation.

In Jamaica, she says, parents give their children the equivalent of what we in America would call a nickname and “it becomes something that the community knows you. Mine (nickname) is Maria. My mother called me Maria. My husband – they call him Garry, but it’s pronounced “Gah-ry”.

I must confess that I have never eaten in a Jamaican restaurant, and although I have not tried the food yet, I did ask about the “stir-fry” dishes.

“The spice and the flavor define it, she said. “We love the earthy spice and the hot sauce, overall.”

Guests will find oxtail, shaken chicken, rice and peas and goat curry on the menu, as well as stewed brown chicken, stewed beef, ribs and jerk pork dishes, as well as a selection of pasta, fish and chicken dishes, salads and Jamaican breakfasts.

So how about a good old-fashioned American burger?

“It’s not on the menu,” Nadette said, but they’ll make you a jerk burger, which she describes as “a beef patty with jerk seasoning.”

Gar & Mar restaurant hours are 11:00 AM to 7:30 PM Monday through Thursday, 11:00 AM to 8:00 PM Friday and Saturday, and 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM Sunday. The restaurant can be reached at 440-403-9252 or online at www.garnmar.com.

Library survey: The Cuyahoga County Public Library System is seeking feedback on its facilities master plan to guide improvements over the next 10 years.

Currently, he is targeting Brook Park residents who are not regular library users to share their ideas and help the library administration maintain the best space and facilities in town.

“Over the next three weeks, we hope you will take a few minutes to complete a brief questionnaire, share it on social media, or forward it to local friends and family who are not typical library users,” said Shayna Muckerheide, director of the Brook Park Library.

The Brook Park Branch of the Cuyahoga County Library is located at 6155 Engle Road and can be reached at 216-267-5250.

Take part in the online survey at https://surveyhero.com/c/CCPLCommunity.

History of Metroparks: Doug Kusak will speak at 7 p.m. July 20 at the Berea Historical Society and History Center, 118 E. Bridge St. The topic will be the history of Cleveland Metroparks.

President’s list: Janelle Ludwick of Berea and Allison Ellis of Brook Park have been named to Capital University’s list of presidents for the spring semester.

Capital has three lists indicating academic distinction among full-time degree-seeking students. They include the President’s List, the Provost’s List, and the Dean’s List.

The President’s list indicates the highest level of academic distinction. Students must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.85 on a 4-point scale to be nominated.

New graduate: Congratulations to Ashoknaidu Gedela of Middleburg Heights, who graduated from the University of the Cumberlands with a Master of Science in Information Technology.

Cumberlands is located in Williamsburg, Ky., and offers undergraduate, graduate, doctoral, and online programs.

With honor: Congratulations to Ethan O’Brien-Scheffer of Berea, who graduated from the University of Miami, cum laude, with a Bachelor of Arts and a major in Creative Writing and Italian Studies.

Treasure hunt : The City of Middleburg Heights will hold a scavenger hunt beginning at 11 a.m. on August 6.

Family and friends are invited to participate. Their missions: to solve the puzzles and reach as many easily recognizable destinations and landmarks throughout the city as possible.

Each team will need a vehicle to participate in the “hunt”. Each participating team will assemble in the parking lot of the Middleburg Heights Community Center, 16000 Bagley Road (nearest Kobak Field).

A recreation staff member will hand out the clue sheet, assign a number to your team, and review the rules.

All teams will return to the Community Center at 12:30 p.m. to tally the scores and award the winning team.

The event will end with ice cream for everyone.

Register on line at https://www.facebook.com/MiddleburgHeightsRecDept/photos/a.500010226313/10159217272786314/.

For the Parc des Écorces: A Pack the Park raffle held June 10 at the Teamz Restaurant, 6611 Eastland Road in Middleburg Heights, raised $4,500 for the new Tri-City Bark Park.

Fundraising included raffle baskets, a 50/50 raffle and buffets. Guy Turner, chairman of the Bark Park Committee, said the funds will be used to buy t-shirts and equipment for the park.

Bark Park is supported by the towns of Berea, Brook Park and Middleburg Heights and is located on Sheldon Road.

SCAN Hunger Center Pantry: 39 W. Bagley Road, Williamsport Plaza. 440-260-7226. Open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the second Friday of the month and 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. the fourth Friday.

Pantry of Street Ministries: 1480 Bagley Road, 440-239-0549. Open from noon to 2 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

Ride in love: Free hot meal from 2-4 p.m. on the third Sunday of the month at St. Adalbert’s Catholic Church, Keller Center, 66 Adalbert Street. Eat in or take away. The next meal is Sunday, then August 21.

Free community meal: St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 276 E. Bagley Road, served 5-6 p.m. second and last Wednesday of the month. Drive-up only. The next meal is July 27.

People’s Community Church Pantry: 628 Wesley Drive, 440-234-0609. Open from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. on the third Saturday of the month. The next open pantry will be Saturday, then August 20.

Pantry for animals: Animal Rescue Friends, 10015 E. River Road, Columbia Station, 10 a.m. to noon every Sunday. Contact 440-234-2034 or arfpet-pantry@gmail.com for more information.

Mini pantry: There are two small free food pantries located near the People’s Community Church, 628 Wesley Drive, and the Berea Branch of the Cuyahoga County Library, 7 Berea Commons. The Prospect Pantry is on the corner of Prospect Street and Jacqueline Drive.

Senior lunches: Monthly Elders Luncheon at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 276 E. Bagley Road in Berea. Lunches are $5 and are served at noon on the second Tuesday of each month. The next lunch is July 12. For more information, call Michelle Skutt at 440-234-6080.

Learn more about the Sun News.

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Milford’s restaurant wins award for best local Jamaican food, but still struggles to stay open https://reggae-shack.com/milfords-restaurant-wins-award-for-best-local-jamaican-food-but-still-struggles-to-stay-open/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/milfords-restaurant-wins-award-for-best-local-jamaican-food-but-still-struggles-to-stay-open/ Whitley-DeMills opened Spice N Flava in May 2020, bringing its Jamaican specialties to Milford’s Boston Post Road at the height of the pandemic. But the battle to attract business has been a tough one, leaving Whitley-DeMills feeling down, but she says she’s far from eliminated. “I’m not giving up,” she said. “Sometimes you have to […]]]>

Whitley-DeMills opened Spice N Flava in May 2020, bringing its Jamaican specialties to Milford’s Boston Post Road at the height of the pandemic. But the battle to attract business has been a tough one, leaving Whitley-DeMills feeling down, but she says she’s far from eliminated.

“I’m not giving up,” she said. “Sometimes you have to jump hurdles and you have to lose to win.”

Spice N Flava struggles to get a consistent clientele at its 40 Boston Post Road location.

“As the only Jamaican restaurant in Milford, I think there should be more opportunities that we could capitalize on,” Whitely-DeMills said.

Whitely-DeMills opened the restaurant with her husband, Devin DeMills, but because the restaurant was struggling, she said her husband had to get back to work so the couple wouldn’t lose their apartment.

“I try not to get depressed with everything I’m going through because it’s real,” she said. “When you invest everything you have in something, you take the risk because you love what you do and I love what I do. So I’m always here. I always fight with what I know and what I do.

The restaurant received a $5,000 grant with help from Milford Economic and Community Development. Whitely-DeMills also praised state Rep. Kathleen Kennedy for her help in securing the grant.

“We are using the grant to pay off some of the debt we have with the owners of the property,” she said. “They also step in to help us pay some of the utilities and bills. We are so grateful.

“They were the only real band that stood by us,” Whitely-DeMills added. “I’m trying to find someone from SCORE to help me do my business plan because I have to do it right.”

However, she said they still owed money and were trying to find a way to pay off their debt.

“I tried loans and other grants, she says. “We went to a bank, and because of our credit, we couldn’t get a $30,000 loan, and at a time like this, what credit is 100% perfect? Everyone has something that affects their credit because they are trying to get ahead.

Spice N Flava hasn’t received much support from groups that help small businesses, Whitely-DeMills noted.

“I trust God that he will do what he promises to do,” she said. “Because, after all, I am still here, which means there is hope and there is possibility.”

Whitley-DeMills admitted that there are times when she feels like closing doors, but something tells her not to.

“When you’re doing what you love, it’s hard to give it up,” she said. “It’s a passion that I have, and so I can’t give up on my passion. I have to find all the means necessary to find ways to get out of this hump. I feel like once I get out of the bump caused by my owner, who was very forgiving, I’ll be on my feet again.

Recently, Spice N Flava was named Best Jamaican Restaurant by the Milford Regional Chamber of Commerce in their 2022 Best of the Milford Region awards.

“We found out on Monday that we won,” Whitely-DeMills said. “I was in shock and crying, because I thought I was about to shut down, but there are people who really like my food and I didn’t know that was happening.

“It’s motivation to keep going, and I know I’m going to be better at my job because I know God is able to carry me through,” she added. “I give thanks and I’m grateful, but now I don’t want to close.”

Things are starting to look up for the better, Whitely-DeMills noted, adding that she reached an agreement with her landlords to give up one side of the building, which would lower her rent.

“They want me to stay,” she said. “They want me to see myself succeed.”

Spice N Flava was part of the June 19 celebration in Milford, and Whitely-DeMills said it was a successful event for them.

“The turnout was good…people came out and supported us,” she said. “In Milford, most people don’t come from that side of town. They go downtown. So for us to be there, in the center where the majority of Milford’s shops and restaurants, was great exposure for us.

However, with inflation causing food prices to rise, she said the menu has been impacted. She said she had to increase the cost of some menu items.

“It’s also a problem because people say it’s a bit too expensive, but at the same time you go to the store and you can’t tell them it’s too expensive,” she says.

Food is one element of the business that Whitley-DeMills knows isn’t contributing to the struggle, as she said the reviews have been excellent.

“I do what I love and you can taste the love of food,” she said.

To help other restaurants like Spice N Flava that are struggling, Whitely-DeMills said it would be a good idea to form a restaurant association.

“Anyone can come to the table and look at some of the things that affect us as restaurateurs and how we can form a committee to get the help needed for each restaurant,” she said.

Adding that many restaurants that are in his situation with Spice N Flava aren’t looking for freebies. They are looking for help.

Simon McDonald, director of membership and marketing at the Milford Regional Chamber of Commerce, said a restaurant association is a good idea, but in practice it’s very difficult to maintain.

On August 6, Whitley-DeMills will celebrate Jamaican Independence Day by hosting a Jamaican Independence Celebration Seafood and Jerk Fest.

“This will be my third year hosting the celebration,” she said. “I hope this will help me attract more people here.”

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Bianca Saunders on the Jamaican food that inspired her last show https://reggae-shack.com/bianca-saunders-on-the-jamaican-food-that-inspired-her-last-show/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 12:31:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/bianca-saunders-on-the-jamaican-food-that-inspired-her-last-show/ June 23, 2022 main pictureBianca Saunders Spring/Summer 2023Photograph by Paul Phung While menswear has become one of fashion’s most coveted areas – due to its fluidity, wearability and subversiveness – Bianca Saunders has become a designer to watch, with her menswear flexible in nature and feminine in essence. After her acclaimed Fall/Winter 2022 presentation and […]]]>

main pictureBianca Saunders Spring/Summer 2023Photograph by Paul Phung

While menswear has become one of fashion’s most coveted areas – due to its fluidity, wearability and subversiveness – Bianca Saunders has become a designer to watch, with her menswear flexible in nature and feminine in essence. After her acclaimed Fall/Winter 2022 presentation and the ANDAM award won last year, Saunders staged her Spring/Summer 2023 show yesterday in a sterile warehouse in Paris, under an effervescent light.

Taste was the motivating factor behind the new collection; Hard food – show title – Jamaican hard food sources like boiled dumplings, bananas and yams. Soft-toned pigments like tans, creams, and yellows replicated the hue of yams and bananas, juxtaposed with bold, electric greens, oranges, and reds that mimicked plantains, pumpkins, and carrots—elements often found in boiled and hard dishes.

“I feel like every season I get the idea of ​​warming up to people and feeling more comfortable being that outgoing person. This collection is definitely more outgoing, but well Of course, I still have some things in store so I have a bit of longevity for the next few years and seasons to come, she explains the day before the show.

Memorable couture attributes from previous seasons were present in this show; grandiose pleated collars appear on French jackets and asymmetrical necklines reappear on feminine tops. With this season’s focus on structured silhouettes, texture and color, the season’s eye-catcher came with the curved lines of structured denim jackets and silky pajama-like sets. Always one to vacillate between the sartorial languages ​​of menswear and womenswear, Saunders showed a tougher, more masculine side to the front of his clothes while adapting the backs of the pieces to have a softer, more masculine edge. more feminine.

Here, in her own words, Saunders tells the story of her Spring/Summer 2023 collection.

“Every season you see things that I could potentially grow into more of. There are so many ideas I have and developments that I really want to push forward. And this season I’ve had a lot more time to develop, so I’ve done a lot more things to perfect those particular ideas. The tailoring is much stronger, the manufacturing is much stronger. I feel like it’s a great continuing story of how the body contour works with the print and back construction can be interesting. It’s definitely a step up from what it was last season.

This collection is inspired by Jamaican hard food. So the idea of ​​turning starchy, natural, hard textures into things – and that’s kind of what happens with the cooking process of making hard foods. I used this concept to inspire this season’s collection. So I always have the common thread of how the hard male side or the soft female side blends together. In the front, the texture can be extremely hard and in the back, it looks more fluid and much more relaxed.

“It’s really about looking at the body and looking at the idea of ​​movement and material, and how that blends together. This season’s color palette has its muted moments, but of course it has the strong, raw colors inspired by Jamaican hard food, like yam, green banana, and with the darker palette; that’s how plantain ripens.

“With this collection, I didn’t really start with music. Last season I had the My Jamaican guy song in the mix, and I was thinking about what Grace Jones would listen to when she was cooking in her kitchen. She wasn’t necessarily a dancehall person, she listened to The Clash and things like that. So those 80s, late 70s sounds are what really carry. I worked with my regular sound engineer, Benny Mails – we work so well together. I’m really excited to see it because it goes through the shock and the idea of ​​cooking and what kind of sound will be in the background. The soundscapes are [like] when you’re dancing and when you’re cooking, but also just the rhythm of what the natural sounds of things moving in the kitchen would be.

“I like the idea of ​​women seeing it [men’s clothes] on the other side of the room and they will go to this section [in the department store]– Bianca Saunders

“Today, I don’t want to sound too sure of myself, but I’m actually really impressed with how everything went so well. Being in Paris really allowed me to be in my little bubble, I really enjoyed that step. It was like starting over, basically, the last time because of the pandemic – no one was able to come to the show. So this season, more people were able to come; it’s like reintroducing what i want people to know about the brand and what i want them to remember When they go shopping for the brand they will know exactly what they want to choose because it is easy to imagine it in a garde -dress.

“I try to do [the clothes] quite timeless, surrounding the concept and idea of ​​what hard food is and picking up the stylistic points. Every season it comes with the idea of ​​warming up to people and feeling more comfortable being that outgoing person. This collection is definitely more outgoing, but of course I still have some things in store, so I have some longevity for the next few years and seasons to come. So you will never know what to expect.

“I’m definitely sticking to what I said I wanted to do from the start. It’s very easy to swing one way and see what others might do, so [I’m] just following my instincts and not being swayed by opinions, and that’s what helped people come to me instead of me coming to them. I like the idea that women will see it [men’s clothes] on the other side of the room and they will go to this section. I think that’s how you bridge the gap, getting women to actively patronize that section of the department store. It’s looking at clothes in a different way. This is something that I will probably continue to do, so it will be for men for a while. I’m just one person, I always design my collections and it’s quite important for me to create the right point of view of what the brand says before diversifying. This is [about] create a good rating first, then branch out, and don’t do things too quickly. I think women like the idea of ​​putting on something that’s masculine, because when they put it on it doesn’t necessarily look the same as on someone else – it looks like something completely different . For example, when Kylie Jenner wore the jeans, I was like, whoa, that was something that looked completely different on the model, but it’s still the same product.

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Jamaican Food Festival captivates local palates in Xian, China https://reggae-shack.com/jamaican-food-festival-captivates-local-palates-in-xian-china/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/jamaican-food-festival-captivates-local-palates-in-xian-china/ Escoveitch fish (Photos: @nakia_wordamouth) Nakia McDonald makes history in Xian, northwest China. Once the terminus of the Silk Road and home to emperors and poets, the historic town is where McDonald, a poet herself, teaches English. Since 2020, the resident of the small town of Victoria also hosts the only Jamaican food festival in the […]]]>

Escoveitch fish (Photos: @nakia_wordamouth)

Nakia McDonald makes history in Xian, northwest China. Once the terminus of the Silk Road and home to emperors and poets, the historic town is where McDonald, a poet herself, teaches English. Since 2020, the resident of the small town of Victoria also hosts the only Jamaican food festival in the dynastic region. Her trip to China started with food.

“I have already been a teacher in Jamaica for five years. One day I was at KFC having lunch with my friend. Someone I knew came in and started telling me about another friend living and teaching in China who was looking for more people. That was it, McDonald’s smile fills her face. The new beginning came with a bittersweet goodbye to her ailing father, whose last words to her were “If you don’t see me again, take care.” Make sure nothing happens to you.

McDonald’s honors his memory by continuing their culinary traditions in his new home.

Father and daughter loved to cook together. McDonald’s often showcased his talents at religious events and food festivals in St. Catherine’s Parish. “My dad loved ackee and salt fish with fried dumplings,” she recalls.

For the past two years, the Jamaica Food Festival has been held in Victoria at a Chinese cafe where her father’s favorite dish is featured. It is a state requirement to find a Chinese sponsor. That in itself is a victory. The food festival gives expats and local Chinese residents a taste of Jamaica through popular dishes like jerk chicken, escoveitch fish, rice and peas and rabbit curry.

Rabbit curry is a crowd pleaser. Xian has a meat-based culture with the use of heavy aromatic spices. In contrast, Jamaica offers a Caribbean punch with a base of spicy flavors. The leaner, drier, gamer meat is first roasted in chilli seeds, Scotch bonnet chilli and yellow curry powder, then slowly cooked. The result is a hearty dish with tender-tasting meat.

In 2021, just under 70 people made the restaurant look like a shoebox. “People kept asking me if they could come to my restaurant,” she laughs. Even shoeboxes need room for a Jamaican DJ. A West Indian carnival unfolded as much on the guests’ plates as on the dance floor. McDonald’s is known as the “chocolate professor” who introduces Jamaica to the locals. Upon her arrival in the city, the new author had mixed reactions.

“I asked a kid to cover his nose because he’d never seen a black person, and I said, ‘Please take your hand off your nose, young man.’ This boy ended up getting attached to me. People are afraid of what they don’t know and don’t understand. That’s why I appreciate my role as a teacher.

She published a book of poetry, black face, because of experiences like this. “I found it necessary to share what real black faces look like. There is a lot of ignorance surrounding race and class. There is a lot of beauty in being part of change.

China is changing and Jamaicans can be proud that Nakia McDonald is charting a new culinary direction for the people of Xian.

To contact McDonald’s, please visit instagram @nakia_wordamouth account

— Bridgett Leslie is an internal auditor by day and a media correspondent by night. She is passionate about Caribbean flavors and the community around this culinary cuisine. She is currently completing her undergraduate studies in gastronomy at Le Cordon Bleu.

Poet Nakia McDonald (Photos: @nakia_wordamouth)

Rice and peas (Photos: @nakia_wordamouth)

Jamaican spice stir-fry (Photos: @nakia_wordamouth)

Jerk chicken (Photos: @nakia_wordamouth)

Expats at the Jamaica Food Festival in 2021 (Photos: @nakia_wordamouth)

Expats at the Jamaica Food Festival in 2021 (Photos: @nakia_wordamouth)

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Peckham business owner devastated by Nigerian and Jamaican food truck stolen after being booked for summer festivals https://reggae-shack.com/peckham-business-owner-devastated-by-nigerian-and-jamaican-food-truck-stolen-after-being-booked-for-summer-festivals/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 18:20:41 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/peckham-business-owner-devastated-by-nigerian-and-jamaican-food-truck-stolen-after-being-booked-for-summer-festivals/ A Peckham family business has been devastated after its food truck was stolen. The owners of Soulddeliciouz, a mobile catering business serving Nigerian and Jamaican dishes, woke up this morning (June 14) to find their food truck missing. Joyce Iyinolakan, 43, told MyLondon: “We are at a loss for words. We called the police straight […]]]>

A Peckham family business has been devastated after its food truck was stolen. The owners of Soulddeliciouz, a mobile catering business serving Nigerian and Jamaican dishes, woke up this morning (June 14) to find their food truck missing.

Joyce Iyinolakan, 43, told MyLondon: “We are at a loss for words. We called the police straight away. It was our livelihood that was stolen. Next week we have a major event “Summer is our busiest time and we’ve already paid for a lot of events, including music festivals. We’re really at a loss for words.”

The lorry was parked on Frensham Street on Friday and had a coupling lock to deter thieves. While exercising in the park this morning, a neighbor asked Joyce and her husband, Tunde, where the truck was as she had not seen it recently. “We thought she must have been confused at first, but then we drove to where she was parked and it was just an immediate sense of shock,” Joyce said.

READ MORE:‘Let him go’: How a Peckham community worked together to save their friend and neighbor from deportation



The truck is branded Souldeliciouz

Neighbors told them they saw the truck parked there on Friday, so they think it was probably stolen between Saturday and Sunday morning. “I don’t know who would do that, it’s not exactly an easy target. I think it had to be something planned rather than someone opportunistic,” Joyce said.

The white truck was branded Souldeliciouz and can be recognized by the right rear leg which is wobbly.

“Please if you have any information on his whereabouts, if you have seen him anywhere, if you have offered to buy him. Please contact us with the information so we can pass it on to the Metropolitan Police “, she said.

Is there a story we should cover? Email josh.bolton@reachplc.com.

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West Winds: Riaz Phillips on the joys of Jamaican cuisine https://reggae-shack.com/west-winds-riaz-phillips-on-the-joys-of-jamaican-cuisine/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 05:04:00 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/west-winds-riaz-phillips-on-the-joys-of-jamaican-cuisine/ What was the research process for your new book, West winds?The main body of the book comes from the first time I went to live in Jamaica. I had no intention of writing this book, I was just trying to experiment and see as much as I could. It wasn’t until I came back and […]]]>

What was the research process for your new book, West winds?
The main body of the book comes from the first time I went to live in Jamaica. I had no intention of writing this book, I was just trying to experiment and see as much as I could. It wasn’t until I came back and looked at everything I had – the photographs, notes and memories – that I thought it would be really amazing to try and capture it all. Food hasn’t really changed much as Jamaicans are very conservative about what they eat. The biggest change is the impact of American culture on the island in terms of the number of pizzerias, burger joints, and fried chicken you see now.

What makes this book different?
Sometimes I feel like Caribbean cuisine is considered a gimmick. In discussions of food trends in Europe and the United States, Caribbean food is often omitted; it’s only really talked about in the summer around Notting Hill Carnival, or sometimes during Black History Month, when in reality it’s as much a part of those conversations as food anywhere elsewhere in the world. Things like nose-to-tail cooking, fermentation and preservation, farm-to-table, raw foods, and even veganism are discussed in West Winds, and I’ve presented the chapters in a way that tries to ‘insert Jamaican food into these discussions where I think they rightly belong.

What is the essence of Jamaican cuisine for you?
One thing I don’t like to do with a large region is try to boil it down to a few dishes – I think that’s a bit reductive – but I wrote a pantry section in the book because, growing up, there were always things on the plate without which no meal is complete. There were always certain ingredients that went into everything, like scotch bonnet peppers, green onions, all-purpose seasoning, and chili seeds. You use it as a base and then see what else you have. It doesn’t matter if you don’t have this or that. If you don’t have sweet potatoes, use regular ones. It won’t taste the same, but it still represents an idea of ​​what we would be eating.

Are there regional variations in Jamaican cuisine?
The island is not that big – you can drive from one side to the other in about five hours. Certain regions and places have become known for certain things, but I think it’s mainly thanks to tourism. I usually travel to Kingston, Ocho Rios and Port Antonio. You have the fast pace of Kingston where there are hundreds of street vendors everywhere. North of Ocho Rios, which tends to be more touristy, you have plenty of waterfront restaurants that pull fish straight from the water and cook up amazing seafood platters. t is a really sleepy town. Many of the restaurants there are an extension of someone’s home, so they have a really cozy atmosphere. But wherever you go, you’re going to have that diversity. There’s going to be a Rastafarian restaurant, a Chinese restaurant, a bakery, a cafe that does seafood, and someone that does jerk.

How is Jamaican food different from the food you grew up with in the UK?
When I was growing up, access to certain foods was very difficult and the things widely available in Jamaica were a luxury in the UK. In some rural areas of Jamaica you’ll only see ackee on the floor, whereas in the UK it’s £5 or £6 for a 500g box. The way it is cooked is also different. In the UK people don’t usually have time to soak beans overnight or cook food for five or six hours, whereas in Jamaica it’s part of the routine of life. It is inevitable that food will taste different.

What are your favorite recipes from the book?
Sweet potato and ginger. I love how the sweet potato cooks just right in coconut milk with a hint of ginger and a little spice from a scotch bonnet pepper. You can just serve it with white rice and it would be quite good. There is also the list of fish. The balance between the sweetness of the coconut milk and the saltiness of the fish is mind blowing to me. You have it with very thick boiled or fried dumplings and you just picked up the rundown.

West Winds: Jamaican Recipes, History and Tales by Riaz Phillips is published by DK.

Check out three recipes from the book, below.

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DJ Khaled and Skillibeng work on new music and eat Jamaican food https://reggae-shack.com/dj-khaled-and-skillibeng-work-on-new-music-and-eat-jamaican-food/ Thu, 26 May 2022 20:31:31 +0000 https://reggae-shack.com/dj-khaled-and-skillibeng-work-on-new-music-and-eat-jamaican-food/ DJ Khaled makes sure Skillibeng eats well before getting to work in the studio. Skillibeng has been on the rise since signing with the RCA label earlier this year, and he’s rubbed shoulders with some of the best in hip hop, including We The Best CEO DJ Khaled. On Wednesday, the pair were seen in […]]]>

DJ Khaled makes sure Skillibeng eats well before getting to work in the studio.

Skillibeng has been on the rise since signing with the RCA label earlier this year, and he’s rubbed shoulders with some of the best in hip hop, including We The Best CEO DJ Khaled.

On Wednesday, the pair were seen in the studio rocking as they sparked speculation that Skillibeng had new music coming. DJ Khaled is not an artist, and he gave up being a DJ for a long time. However, his role as a producer has seen him work with artists like Nicki Minaj, Drake, Rihanna, Justin Bieber and many more and his accomplishments are many, he even received the respect of Kanye West.

Now Skillibeng is next on the list as his career develops in the United States. DJ Khaled, who has an endless love affair with Jamaica and all things Jamaican, was seen hosting the ‘Crocodile Teeth’ artist in his home.

Khaled’s chef is seen in a video telling Skillibeng that a Jamaican meal has been prepared for him and his team. The table included curried goat, oxtail, rice and peas, and even lobster with a Jamaican patty.

Other dishes were escovitch fish and jerk chicken as Khaled urged the young Jamaican to make himself at home while the chef told him the meal was made for them to have a taste of home.

DJ Khaled dines with Skillibeng

Khaled’s hospitality never goes unnoticed as he is often treated the same way in Jamaica when he visits his family.

In the meantime, Skillibeng recently released their five-track EP, Mr Universeearlier this month, and he has been very busy touring and promoting the project, one of his singles, “Whap whap”, received massive airplay and fan love overseas. .

Very little has been revealed in Instagram posts about the St Thomas native’s studio session with the American record producer. However, DJ Khaled said in his captions that he was in album mode.

While Skillibeng didn’t share any details about the link, DJ Khaled ensured everyone knew he was in album mode as he often shares with his outlandish posts.

“SKILLI GETTING CRAZY HERE!” Album mode is special! Khaled captioned a video of Skillibeng in front of a microphone.

In the meantime, Skillibeng is expected to release their next studio album this summer. It should continue to spin and perform for Mr Universe in June.

DJ Khaled adopted Jamaica and vice versa as his second national and is often proclaimed “Yard Man” on Instagram. For those of you who are unfamiliar with the expression “Yard man”, it means that you are from Jamaica or that you are of Jamaican descent. Khaled often credits Jamaican music culture for giving him his first big break in music when he was a struggling DJ in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Today, he makes a point of including reggae and dancehall music in his projects and even regularly shoots music videos in Jamaica while giving back to the culture that gave him a platform.

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